Master Course List

AC201 - Principles of Accounting I

Introduction to the business approach to accounting systems with emphasis on a) the role of accounting in starting, establishing, and operating a business, b) the accounting cycle, and c) merchandising operations. Practical applications of math, communication, and skills used in business will be integrated

AC202 - Principles of Accounting II

The continued study of business accounting systems with an emphasis on a) partnerships, b) corporations, c) financial statement analyses, and d) managerial accounting.

AC260 - Internship

Internship under a cooperative arrangement between the division and an agency, institution, or firm. May be taken for 1-3 credit hours.

AC260 - Special Problems

Independent study or research on a subject of interest to an individual student. May be taken for 1-5 credit hours.

AC301 - Intermediate Accounting

Advanced study of accounting practices with emphasis on the conceptual framework and principles, the financial statements, their elements and supporting schedules, and the time value of money.

AC305 - Intermediate Accounting II

A continuation of the study of accounting practices with emphasis on earnings per share, pensions, leases, income tax, accounting errors and changes, and additional aspects of financial reporting and financial analysis.

AC313 - Fraud Examination

The course will cover all the major methods that employees use to commit occupational fraud. Students will learn how and why occupational fraud is committed, how fraudulent conduct can be deterred, and how allegations of fraud should be investigated and resolved.

AC320 - Cost Accounting

Considers commonly used cost accounting concepts and methods, along with special problem-solving techniques, to be used by management in controlling current operations, costing products, and services and planning for the future. Application of these procedures via spreadsheets includes manufacturing, merchandising and service organizations.

AC340 - Income Tax

Survey of individual federal income tax laws. Topics will include property transactions; business, farm, rent, royalty, and investment income; and employee expenses. Forms 1040EZ, 1040A, and 1040 and the accompanying schedules are considered.

AC350 Accounting for Governmental and Not-for-Profit Organizations

Concepts and techniques of accounting for organizations which are not seeking profits. Topics include the concept of a fund; various types of funds; special problems of municipalities, public schools, universities, hospitals, churches and the federal government.

AC360 - Special Problems

Independent study or research on a subject of interest to an individual student. May be taken for 1-5 credit hours.

AC368 Internship

Internship under a cooperative arrangement between the division and an agency, institution, or firm. May be taken for 1-12 credit hours.

AC370 - Information Systems

Survey of the systems development process and the role of information systems in business with emphasis on accounting information systems. Students will become familiar with the general role, structure, and control of the accounting information system. A specific application software package for a small business is introduced and used. Cross-listed with MG370

AC370 Information Systems

Survey of the systems development process and the role of information systems in business with emphasis on accounting information systems. Students will become familiar with the general role, structure, and control of the accounting information system. A specific application software package for a small business is introduced and used. Cross-listed with AC370.

AC430- Auditing

Investigative techniques with emphasis on the decision making process. Major areas include the audit environment, theory and concepts, auditing specific cycles and accounts, completing the audit, and reporting the results.

AC460 - Special Problems

Independent study or research on a subject of interest to an individual student. May be taken for 1-5 credit hours.

AC468 - Senior Internship

Internship under a cooperative arrangement between the division and an agency, institution, or firm. May be taken for 1-15 credit hours.

AC480 - Senior Capstone in Accounting

Within this capstone course students will demonstrate their integrated knowledge, growth and broad mastery of the knowledge and skills gained throughout the program. Students will read significant works in Accounting and create reflections of those readings by using critical thinking and collaboration to explain, analyze and make recommendations regarding current problems within the industry. They will lead professional discussions and use multimodal communication in the examination of current industry topics such as, harassment, discrimination, diversity, and ethical dilemmas, in a professional engaged manner.

AC490 - Special Topics in Accounting

Advanced course on a topic not included in the regular curriculum. May be taken for 1-3 credit hours.

AG330 Agribusiness Marketing

This course focuses on marketing and economic principles as they apply to agribusiness.  Topics will include: marketing strategies, marketing research and information, segmentation and targeting, marketing mix, and marketing plans.  Students will have the opportunity to apply theory and practice during a review and revision of a local business of their choice.

AG342 Agricultural Policy

This course will provide students an opportunity to explore the policies (past and present) that have shaped the economics of agriculture.  Students will have the opportunity to research and debate different policy issues related to agricultural policy in the US.

AG350 Agricultural Economics

This course will apply previous knowledge gained in the micro and macro-economics courses to agricultural markets.  Students will examine economic processes of price discovery and price determination in agricultural input on output markets, and analyze their application to decision processes in agribusiness.

AG356 Farm Management

This course will provide students with management concepts specific to farming.  Specific topics will include: measuring performance, financial analysis, economic principles, budgeting, management skills, and resource acquisition.

AG375 Agricultural Law

This course will introduce areas of the law specific to agriculture. Content will build upon previous Business Law coursework and include: contract law, torts law, and property law as they apply to agribusiness.  Additional topics specific to agriculture will also be addressed.

AG455 Agricultural Commodities

This course will provide students an overview of agricultural futures and options markets, and how these tools are used to manage risk while providing for a growing population.  Students will have the opportunity to explore topics on grains/oilseeds as well as livestock.

AH212 Medical Terminology

The purpose of this class is to familiarize the student with typical medical terminology, how these terms are constructed, and the meaning of pertinent prefixes and suffices associated with the technical healthcare language.

AH300 Professional Nursing Practice

This course will introduce students to the role of the baccalaureate prepared nurse.  Students will transition from clinicians to professionals, and acquire a deeper understanding of the nursing profession.    

AH305 Adaptive Health and Assessment

This course introduces the student to physical assessment using the adaptation nursing model. The four modes of adaptation are explored with the focus on psychosocial needs identified through interview skills and physiologic needs identified through physical assessment skills. The framework is applied to health restoration, maintenance and enhancement of nursing interventions with a focus on wellness.   (2.5 lecture hours, .5 clinical hour)

AH316 - Data Analysis for Nursing Practice

This course focuses on statistical data and terminology as they apply to allied health practice.  Students will learn the importance of statistics in performing data analysis and will be introduced to basic statistical procedures.

AH317 Health Professions Research

Introduction to research in health professions. Topics include elements of the research process, examination of research design, development of research proposals, and application of the research process in the clinical area.

AH324 - Anatomy and Kinesiology for Health Professions

The study of human anatomy and movement principles as applied to health professions for injury evaluation, rehabilitation and biomechanical assessment. Analysis of movement from the study of anatomical structures and mechanical principles of the human body. This course satisfies additional degree requirements in science.

AH330 Business Concepts in Health Care Case Management

Business Concepts in Health Care/Case Management focuses on the economics of health care, legal aspects of health care, health care systems in the U.S., case management issues, and budgeting.   

AH390 Special Topics

variable credit hours

AH400 Health Care Informatics

The student is introduced to the current basic requirements for the recording and appropriate sharing of health information through mostly electronic systems. Included are aspects of the evolving Electronic Medical Record.  

AR111 Art Appreciation

An introduction to the many forms and roles of art worldwide: the themes, media, elements, and principles of design in two- and three-dimensional art. The historical sequence of cultures and styles from the earliest times to present will be traced through their greatest works. Meets Fine Arts req.    MOTR ARTS 100 Art Appreciation Core 42 Website

AR116 Basic Photography

Basics of photography, including the history and digital evolution of photography as an art medium. Instruction includes the use of digital cameras, natural and artificial lighting, composition, presentational methods and basic Photoshop editing. A lab fee is assessed; students are responsible for printing their portfolio. Students need access to a DSLR or digital camera (not a point-and-shoot). Fulfills "Fine Arts" requirements.

AR121 Basics of Design

A study of and application of two-dimensional and three-dimensional art to include drawing, perspectives, models, etc. The course includes a component of art history and theory. A lab fee is assessed; students are responsible for purchasing their own supplies. Fulfills "Fine Arts" requirements.

AR130 Studio Art

Specific course study within two-dimensional and three-dimensional art depending on instructor expertise and availability. Course topics could include drawing, painting (watercolor, acrylics, oils), ceramics, sculpture, book making, and fibers (weaving, macramé, fiber sculpture). The course includes a component of art history and theory. A fee is required to cover the cost of materials for the course. May be repeated under different course subtitles. Fulfills "Fine Arts" requirements.

AR186 Art History I

A study of the major world cultures and their artistic achievements. Covers prehistoric art to the end of the Medieval Period. Fulfills "Fine Arts" requirement.   MOTR ARTS 101 Art History I Core 42 Website

AR188 Art History II

A study of the major world cultures and their artistic achievements. Covers prehistoric art to the end of the Medieval Period. Fulfills "Fine Arts" requirement.   MOTR ARTS 102 Art History IICore 42 Website

AR290 Special Topics

Variable credit hours, 1-3 hours. Offered on demand.

AR390 Special Topics

Variable credit hours, 1-3 hours. Offered on demand.

AS101 Descriptive Astronomy

An elementary survey of the solar system and the historical development of scientific thinking in astronomy. The laboratory provides experience with telescopes and other astronomical equipment of Morrison Observatory. 3 lectures.

AS101L - Descriptive Astronomy lab

Lab exercises that accompany AS101

AS102 - Descriptive Astronomy Beyond the Solar System

A survey of stars, galaxies and cosmology. The laboratory provides experience with telescopes and other astronomical equipment of Morrison Observatory. 3 lectures. AS 101 is not a prerequisite for AS102.

AS102L - Descriptive Astronomy Lab

Lab exercises that accompany AS102. Must be taken concurrently with AS102.

AT511 Introduction to Evidence Based Practice Clinical Experience

This course is intended to expand students' ability to appropriately use research literature to guide clinical decision making and practice and as an introduction to clinical experiences. Focus will be on policy and procedures related to the application of introductory on- field skills and treatment plans through laboratory practice and clinical experiences in varied settings.

AT512 Therapeutic Interventions

This course is an introduction to therapeutic interventions. Focus will be on policy and procedures related to the application of introductory modalities and rehabilitation skills.

AT513 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries

Study of the proper methods for prevention, recognition, immediate care, and pathology for common sports related injuries and illnesses.

AT521A Athletic Training Research 1

This course introduces the concepts, processes, and applications of athletic training research. The research role of the athletic trainer in decision making and clinical practice will be examined. Students will read and critique research on athletic training practice and will discuss problems and challenges in conducting athletic training research. Throughout the course, there will be opportunities to practice various aspects of the research process (Research areas/types/designs, choosing a topic, and writing a research question). The student will develop a research proposal and conduct a literature review about his or her topic. The student will begin the formal writing of this research proposal. Lecture and Discussion.

AT521B - Athletic Training Research 2

This course is a continuation of concepts, processes, and applications of athletic training research. The research role of the athletic trainer in decision making and clinical practice will be examined. Students will read and critique research on athletic training practice and will discuss problems and challenges in conducting athletic training research. Throughout the course, there will be opportunities to practice various aspects of the research process (Literature review and Introduction ). The student will develop a research proposal and conduct a literature review about his or her topic. The student will begin the formal writing of this research proposal. Lecture and Discussion.

AT522 Upper Extremity Assessment and Rehabilitation I

Emphasis is on orthopedic evaluation and rehabilitation techniques for the upper extremities.

AT523 Lower Extremity Assessment and Rehabilitation I

Emphasis is on orthopedic evaluation and rehabilitation techniques for the lower extremities as well as injury and illness assessment.

AT524 General Medical Conditions

A study of the knowledge, skills and values an athletic trainer must possess to assess general medical conditions for the physically active. Course content to include: assessment of the trunk, chest, abdomen, lower axial spine, illnesses, skin conditions and will teach the application of general medical assessment techniques used by health care providers.

AT527 Clinical Experience in AT 1

This is a clinical rotation designed to give the student practical experience and allow the athletic training student to integrate and apply the proficiencies from the various domains.

AT531 Movement Assessment

This course will provide various methods of assessment of biomechanics to be utilized in prevention, diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation.

AT532 Leadership and Organization and Administration of AT

Skills necessary related to maintaining the athlete's athletic training records, inspecting athletic training facilities to ensure compliance with mandated safety standards, purchasing of and caring for equipment and supplies, establishing procedures and policies for the daily operation of the athletic training room and establishing an emergency support and triage plan.

AT533 Head Trunk and Spine Assessment and Rehabilitation II

Emphasis is on orthopedic evaluation and rehabilitation techniques for the head, trunk and spine. Course runs first 8 weeks of the semester.

AT534 Emerging Practices.

This course will focus on emerging topics in athletic training. Included in the course will be advanced wound closure techniques, IM/IC/ID injection and IV therapy, casting and bracing techniques, and Rock Taping techniques. This course provides classroom and laboratory experience.

AT538 Clinical Immersion in AT 1

This is a clinical rotation designed to give the student practical experience and allow the athletic training student to integrate and apply the proficiencies from various domains.

AT548 Clinical Immersion in AT 2

This is a clinical rotation designed to give the student practical experience and allow the athletic training student to integrate and apply the proficiencies from various domains.

AT550 BOC 1

This course is designed for athletic training students in preparation for the BOC certification exam. Concentration will be given to the domains of athletic training focusing on studying for the BOC Certification exam.

AT551 Pharmacology in Athletic Training

This class provides the basic principles of pharmacology specifically aimed at the needs of the athletic trainer. The majority of drug categories are those pertaining to the treatment of athletic injuries and general medical conditions. However, drugs that may affect athletic performance are also studied. Upon completing this course, students should have sufficient knowledge about drugs to provide basic information, to improve adherence with therapy, and to identify drug-related problems in athletes. This class identifies the role of theAthletic Trainer regarding therapeutic use and effects of specific drugs. This course will meet the competencies and standards related to pharmacology set forth by CAATE.

AT557 Clinical Experience in AT 2

This is a clinical rotation designed to give the student practical experience and allow the athletic training student to integrate and apply the proficiencies from various domains.

AT560 BOC 2

This course is designed for athletic training students in preparation for the BOC certification exam. Concentration will be given to the domains of athletic training focusing on studying for the hybrid and practical portions of the BOC Certification exam.

AT566A Research Methods in Athletic Training 1

This Course is a continuation from AT 521 A and B. The student continues an independent research project of their choice. Options will include, but are not limited to, case studies, literature review, group research project, etc. This part of the project will contain data collection, data analysis, common measure in athletic training, and discussion of results. This is a directed study under the supervision of faculty.

AT566B Research Methods in Athletic Training 2 Capstone

This course is a continuation of AT566A. The student will complete a culminating evidence based research project related to the field of athletic training. Options will include, but are not limited to, case studies, literature review, group research project, etc. This part of the project will contain data collection, data analysis, and discussion of results. This is a directed study under the supervision of faculty.

AT568 Clinical Immersion in AT 3

This is a clinical rotation designed to give the student practical experience and allow the athletic training student to integrate and apply the proficiencies from various domains.

BH321 Introduction to ABA

This course covers the basic principles of applied behavior analysis and behavior modification procedures. Students learn the principals of positive and negative reinforcement, positive and negative punishment, and stimulus control. Students will learn to identify verbal operants and how to implement them in a way to increase functional communication as well as decrease problem behaviors. Student will also begin to identify the core concepts of reinforcement, punishment, and extinction as they apply to modifying behaviors. This class also introduces students to functional behavior assessments.

BH323 Behavioral Pharmacology

While in an applied setting, students will take principals learned in the BCaBA course sequence and apply them. Student will be supervised on site as well as remotely by the course BCBA. Students will be expected to record themselves working directly with clients, as well as attend weekly group meetings and individual meetings when necessary. An intensive practicum is meant to provide fluency of the task list. Students are expected to demonstrate skill and knowledge in behavior analytic, ethical and professional domains. Skills taught in BH321, BH325 and BH421

BH325 Professionalism in ABA

In this stand-alone ethics course students will learn the importance of ethics. We will discuss, in depth, the code of ethics for behavior analysts. Students will also become proficient in The Professional and Ethical Compliance Code. In addition to ethics, students will also be instructed on HIPAA.

BH380 ABA Intensive Practicum I

While in an applied setting, students will take principals learned in the BCaBA course sequence and apply them. Student will be supervised on site as well as remotely by the course BCBA. Students will be expected to record themselves working directly with clients, as well as attend weekly group meetings and individual meetings when necessary. An intensive practicum is meant to provide fluency of the task list. Students are expected to demonstrate skill and knowledge in behavior analytic, ethical and professional domains. Skills taught in BH321, BH325 and BH421

BH385 ABA Intensive Practicum II

While in an applied setting, students will take principals learned in the BCaBA course sequence and apply them. Student will be supervised on site as well as remotely by the course BCBA. Students will be expected to record themselves working directly with clients, as well as attend weekly group meetings and individual meetings when necessary. An intensive practicum is meant to provide fluency of the task list. Students are expected to demonstrate skill and knowledge in behavior analytic, ethical and professional domains. Skills taught in BH427 will be reinforced and expanded upon in this practicum

BH421 Behavioral Assessment

This course covers selecting and defining target behaviors, behavior measurement, and assessment for program planning. Students will explore various assessment methods including Functional Behavior Assessments, Preference Assessments, and functional skill assessments.

BH422 Verbal Behavioral Analysis

This course introduces students to a behavior analytic approach to the behavior of speakers and listeners. Students first learn the 7 types of elementary verbal operants identified by B. F. Skinner and to recognize examples of the concepts as they can be seen in everyday life. Structural and developmental issues, as well as implications for language training and remediation are integrated throughout.

BH423 Behavior Change Procedures

In this course, students will build upon previously learned material (positive and negative reinforcement and punishment, stimulus control). Motivating operations will also be covered in this course. Students will also explore applications of these principles using various methods, including discrete trial teaching, naturalistic teaching, functional communication training, token economies, and others. Importance of planning for generalization and maintenance will be reviewed.

BH424 ABA Methodologies

This course provides an in-depth review of applied behavior analytic techniques. Students will learn to apply behavior analytic principles toward the improvement of socially significant behaviors in a wide range of settings as well as to evaluate the effects of behavioral procedures.

BH425 Advanced Topics in ABA

This course covers advanced topics important for applied work. Students will review topics related to intervention development and evaluation, including issues impacting effective implementation such as caregiver training, program evaluation, treatment integrity, and social validity.

BH426 Research and Data Analysis Methods

The course will cover research methods including withdrawal, reversal, alternating treatment, changing criterion, and multiple-baseline designs. Students will learn how to collect, display, and interpret data. Students will learn how to analyze data to make ethical and behaviorally sound decisions.

BH427 Leadership and Management in Applied Behavior Analysis

In this course students will learn the supervision standards. Students will identify appropriate supervision activities. Students will also be educated on the role of a BCaBA when supervising an RBT (registered behavior technician). Student will learn the importance of contracts when supervising.

BH480 ABA Intensive Practicum III - Capstone

While in an applied setting, students will take principals learned in the BCaBA course sequence and apply them. Student will be supervised on site as well as remotely by the course BCBA. Students will be expected to record themselves working directly with clients, as well as attend weekly group meetings and individual meetings when necessary. An intensive practicum is meant to provide fluency of the task list. Students are expected to demonstrate skill and knowledge in behavior analytic, ethical and professional domains. Skills taught in BH423, BH426 will be reinforced and expanded upon in this course. 

BI101 - General Biology

This introductory course is for majors only. Topics include methods of scientific study, basics of chemistry, cell biology, membranes, enzymes, cell division, photosynthesis, metabolism, genetics on a molecular and cellular level, evolution and population biology. Three lectures.   MOTR BIOL 150 Biology  Core 42 Website

BI101L - General Biology Lab

Lab exercises that accompany BI101.   MOTR BIOL 150L Biology with Lab Core 42 Website

BI102 - General Biology

This is a continuation of the BI101 course. Focuses include a survey of animal body systems together with an introduction to ecology. Topics cover the digestive system, immune system, circulatory system, endocrine system, nervous system, reproductive system, ecology, ecosystems, and conservation. Three lectures.

BI102L - General Biology Lab

Lab exercises that accompany BI102. Must be taken concurrently with BI102.

BI103 Integrated Biology

(3 lectures, 2 laboratory hours). This introductory course and lab is intended to provide non-science majors with an understanding of the basic principles of biology. Topics include methods of scientific inquiry, cell biology, enzymes, cell division, photosynthesis, metabolism, genetics, evolution, and ecology and population biology.

BI105 - Introduction to Environmental Science

This introductory course is primarily aimed at non-majors. This study of Biology with a focus on Environmental Science will cover topics including the inter-relations of humans with our environment; environmental ethics; risk assessment; public policy solutions; and soil, air, water, and energy conservation. The laboratory portion of the course focuses on the methodology of Environmental Science. Three lectures. MOTR BIOL 150L Biology with Lab Core 42 Website

BI105L - Introduction to Environmental Science Lab

Lab exercises that accompany BI105. MOTR BIOL 100LEV Essentials in Biology with Lab Core 42 Website

BI106 - Human Biology

This introductory course is primarily aimed at non-pre-health professions majors. This is a study of Biology with a focus on human Biology and will cover the systems of the human body involved in maintenance, support, movement, coordination, and reproduction. The course also will cover the basics of human genetics, evolution, and ecology. Three lectures. MOTR LIFS 150 Human Biology with Lab Core 42 Website

BI106L - Human Biology Lab

Lab exercises that accompany BI106. MOTR LIFS 150L Human Biology with Lab Core 42 Website

BI107 - Human Anatomy

Introduction to the basic components of the human anatomical systems. Four lectures.

BI107L - Human Anatomy Lab

Lab exercises that accompany BI107. Must be taken concurrently with BI107.

BI108 - Biodiversity

This course is an introduction to the science of Biology, within the topic of biological diversity. It includes the study of the classification and evolution of all major groups of living organisms. Students will become familiar with the major groups of viruses, bacteria, protists, fungi, plants, and animals. The course includes a lab focusing on the observation and classification of living organisms. This introductory course is required for Biology majors and is appropriate for non-Biology majors. Three lectures.

BI108L - Biodiversity Lab

Lab exercises that accompany BI108. Must be taken concurrently with BI108.

BI110 - Introduction to Biotechnology

This introductory course is primarily aimed at non-majors. This is a study of biotechnology, including the science behind it, how it is regulated, the impact on society, and ethical concerns raised by new advances in biological sciences. Three lecture hours.

BI190 - Special Topics

May be taken for 1-3 credit hours.

BI205 - General Physiology

General physiological process with emphasis on the organs and systems of man and their inter-relationship. Four lectures.

BI205L - General Physiology Lab

Lab exercises that accompany BI205. Must be taken concurrently with BI205.

BI300 - Ornithology

This course is about the biology of birds. Topics include avian ecology, evolution, behavior and identification. Students will learn to identify the birds of Missouri by sight and by sound. Includes a survey of the orders of birds of the world and field trips to view and study local birds. Three lectures.

BI300L - Ornithology Lab

Lab exercises that accompany BI300. Must be taken concurrently with BI300.

BI301 - Ecology

Study of interactions and interrelations between organisms and the environment. Topics include natural history, evolution, adaptation to the environment, population ecology, species interactions, communities, ecosystems, landscape and global ecology. Three lectures. Cross-listed with ES301.

BI301L - Ecology Lab

Lab exercises that accompany BI301. Must be taken concurrently with BI301.

BI302 - Botany

Study of basic plant morphology, physiology and taxonomy. Two lectures.

BI302L - Botany Lab

Lab exercises that accompany BI302. Must be taken concurrently with BI302.

BI304 - Mammalogy

This course is about the biology of mammals. Topics include mammalian ecology, evolution, behavior and identification. Students will learn to identify the mammals of Missouri. This course includes a survey of the orders of mammals of the world. Field trips to capture, view and study local mammals will be included. Three lectures.

BI304L - Mammalogy Lab

Lab exercises that accompany BI304. Must be taken concurrently with BI304.

BI305 - Microbiology

The role of bacteria and other micro-organisms in nature. The principles of the subject as related particularly to agriculture, domestic science, sanitation, public health, nursing, and medicine. Three lectures.

BI305L - Microbiology Lab

Lab exercises that accompany BI305. Must be taken concurrently with BI305.

BI306 - Genetics

The molecular, biochemical and cytological basis for inheritance; the cellular mechanisms and laws of transfer between generations, and their practical applications as related to human welfare. Special attention is paid to the impact of genomics. Three lectures.

BI306L - Genetics Lab

Lab exercises that accompany BI306. Must be taken concurrently with BI306.

BI307 - Comparative Animal Behavior

A study of behavior across the animal kingdom, emphasizing instinctive behavior, but also considering learning and cognition. The behavior of vertebrates and invertebrates will be studied from evolutionary, ecological, and physiological perspectives. Three lectures.

BI307L - Comparative Animal Behavior Lab

Lab exercises that accompany BI307. Must be taken concurrently with BI307.

BI309 - Histology

The study of microscopic anatomy of vertebrate tissues and organ systems. Two lectures.

BI309L - Histology Lab

Lab exercises that accompany BI309. Must be taken concurrently with BI309.

BI311 - Conservation Biology and Natural Resource Management

An exploration of the science of conservation biology, which is an applied field that combines the principles of ecology, population genetics, biogeography, economics sociology, political science, philosophy and other fields to solve problems associated with conserving the world's biodiversity. The course will also investigate issues of natural resource management, including endangered species management, reserve design, and restoration ecology. Cross-listed with ES311.

BI315 - Immunology

Concepts and characteristics of the immune system in health and disease. The course addresses issues and questions relevant to human behavior, public health, medicine, the environment and ethics.

BI317 - Biochemistry and Cellular Physiology

The chemistry of biological systems, with emphasis on the biosynthesis, catalysis, and the metabolic role of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic acids, vitamins, hormones and other substances related to life processes. Three lectures.

BI317L - Biochemistry and Cellular Physiology Lab

Lab exercises that accompany BI317. Must be taken concurrently with BI317.

BI318 Toxicology and Environmental Medicine

A discussion of corrosive and toxic substances that affect the environment. Topics include fundamentals of sample collection, reliability of measurements, methods of detection, chemical composition of cells, chemical processes of life, the effects of toxic substances on cells and organisms, and risk assessment. Cross-listed with ES318.

BI320 - Molecular and Cellular Biology

A study of the cell structure and function with an emphasis upon eukaryotes. Topics include organelle structure and function, protein structure, receptor structure and signal transduction, movement of materials into and throughout the cell, and cancer. Labs will focus on current molecular biology techniques. Three lecture hours.

BI320L - Molecular and Cellular Biology Lab

Lab exercises that accompany BI320. Must be taken concurrently with BI320.

BI380 - Major Readings

Study of the current principles of biology, current biological journal readings and current books in the field. Open only to juniors and seniors majoring in Biology.

BI460 - Special Problems

May be taken for 1-5 credit hours.

BU110 Introducation to Business

Survey course to acquaint students with the major institutions and practices in the business world, to provide the elementary concepts of business, to act as an orientation course for selecting a major, and to provide information on business career opportunities.

BU190 Special Topics

Variable credit hours, 1-3 hours. Introductory course on a topic not included in the regular curriculum.

BU225 Computer Application in Business

The course includes the use of microcomputer spreadsheet application software. Topics include creating, formatting, and manipulating files, graphs, and databases; using relational and logical operators to extract data; linking databases and creating reports. Emphasis is on business applications (i.e. Microsoft Office).

BU228 Electronic Commerce

Processes, opportunities and challenges in electronic business technologies. Tools and strategies for using the Internet will be covered.

BU260 Special Problems

Variable credit hours, 1-5 hours. Independent study or research on a subject of interest to an individual student.

BU268 Internship and Field Experiences

Variable credit hour, 1-15 hours.

BU290 Special Topics

Variable credit hours, 1-3 hours. Intermediate-level course on a topic not included in the regular curriculum.

BU341 Business Law, Contracts

Introduction to legal considerations that influence a businessperson. Topics include the legal environment of business, contracts and the Uniform Commercial Code.

BU342 Business Law, Commercial

Study of law with emphasis on agency and employment, property, bankruptcy, legal aspects of business organizations, and government regulation.

BU360 Special Problems

Variable credit hours, 1-5 hours. Independent study or research on a subject of interest to an individual student.

BU368 Internship and Field Experiences

Variable hours, 1-15 hours.

BU390 Special Topics

Variable credit hours, 1-3 hours. Advanced course on a topic not included in the regular curriculum.

BU460 Special Problems

Variable credit hours, 1-5 hours. Independent study or research on a subject of interest to an individual student.

BU468 Internship and Field Experiences

Variable credit hours, 1-15 hours.

BU480 Senior Capstone in Business

Within this capstone course students will demonstrate their integrated knowledge, growth and broad mastery of the knowledge and skills gained throughout the program. Students will read significant works in Business and create reflections of those readings by using critical thinking and collaboration to explain, analyze and make recommendations regarding current problems within the industry. They will lead professional discussions and use multimodal communication in the examination of current industry topics such as, harassment, discrimination, diversity, and ethical dilemmas, in a professional engaged manner.

BU490 Special Topics

Variable credit hours, 1-3 hours. Advanced course on a topic not included in the regular curriculum.

CH107 - Chemistry-Allied Health

A survey of concepts for General Chemistry, Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry. The course includes an introduction to atomic theory, structure and nomenclature for organic and inorganic molecules, and reactions and properties of inorganic, organic, and biochemical systems.

CH111 - General Chemistry

An introduction to general chemistry and elementary physical chemistry, including atomic theory and structure, periodic table, reactions and properties of elements and compounds. Those lacking college preparation Chemistry need permission of instructor and division chair. Three lectures. MOTR CHEM 150 Chemistry I Core 42 Website

CH111L - General Chemistry Lab

Lab exercises that accompany CH111. MOTR CHEM 150L Chemistry I with Lab Core 42 Website

CH114 - General Chemistry with Qualitative Analysis

A continuation of the topics in CH111 with emphasis on reactions, equilibria of elements, compounds and solutions, including the techniques of qualitative analysis. Three lectures.

CH114L - General Chemistry with Qualitative Analysis Lab

Lab exercises that accompany CH114. Must be taken concurrently with CH114.

CJ 202 - Criminal Law

Origin, development and classification of the substantive criminal law defenses and criminal responsibility.

CJ100 - Introduction to Criminal Justice

The history, nature and function of the criminal justice system in America. MOTR CRJS 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice Core 42 Website

CJ190 - Special Topics

Introductory course on a topic not included in the regular curriculum. May be taken for 1-5 credit hours.

CJ201 - Police Organization and Management

Principles and practices common to the effective management of law enforcement agencies.

CJ203 - History of Corrections and Penal Institutions

An historical analysis of the development of corrections and penal institutions in the United States and the influence of changing social philosophies on this development.

CJ204 - Global Crime

An examination of international crime operations including sea and air piracy, smuggling and terrorism. Cross-listed with PS204.

CJ206 - Criminal Investigation

This class introduces the student majoring in Criminal Justice to the history and evolution of criminal investigation, the legal aspects of investigation, and basic crime-scene techniques including crime scene searches, photography and sketching, interviewing, the collection and preservation of physical evidence, and property crimes. Open only to Criminal Justice majors.

CJ260 - Special Problems

Independent study or research on a subject of interest to an individual student. May be taken for 1-5 credit hours.

CJ268 - Internship and Field Experiences

May be taken for 1-5 credit hours.

CJ270 - Criminal Procedure

Survey of criminal procedure, those stipulations that guide detention, arrest, pretrial, trial, conviction and corrections, as well as other associated topics. The course forms a theoretical bridge between criminal and constitutional law.

CJ290 - Special Topics

Intermediate-level course on a topic not included in the regular curriculum.

CJ301 -Constitutional Aspects of Criminal Justice

An examination of U.S. case law regarding the rights and privileges of criminal defendants with regard to electronic surveillance, entrapment, self-incrimination, plea bargaining, trial, double jeopardy and sentencing.

CJ304 - Capital Punishment

This survey class will address moral, constitutional, and legal considerations as well as issues of application of capital punishment in the United States.

CJ306 - Serial Crime and Profiling

This course is about reconstructing the serial offender's motives and intent by closely examining all evidence left by a perpetrator at a crime scene. This course is intended to provide students with the skills and information necessary to profile a broad array of serial crimes and will involve review and analysis of actual cases and crime scenes.

CJ308 - American Constitutional Law and Judicial Process

Study of the leading American constitutional principles and major decisions of the Supreme Court. An analysis of the role played by judges and courts in public policy formation. Cross-listed with PS308.

CJ309 - Law in American Society

A study of the role of law and legal institutions in the American system of justice. Cross-listed with PS309.

CJ314 - Social Deviance

Sociological approaches to deviance are reviewed and various forms of social deviance are examined as is the process involved in changing the status of a behavior from deviant to not and vice-versa. Cross-listed with SO314.

CJ315 - Criminology

The nature, extent, causes, control and prevention of crime. Cross-listed with SO315.

CJ316 - Criminal Investigation II

This class is a continuation of CJ206 Criminal Investigation I and addresses crimes against persons, drug crimes, and terrorism.

CJ318 - Juvenile Justice

This course provides a comprehensive analysis of the juvenile justice system including the historical and philosophical roots of the system, sources of influence on youth development, the movement toward diversion and deinstitutionalization, police interaction, youth gangs, juvenile courts and due process, corrections and community intervention. This course also explores themes of abuse, neglect, status offenses, and delinquency.

CJ330 - Principles of Public Administration

Introductory survey of public administration with reference to organization, personnel management, financial administration, and administrative process. Cross-listed with PS330.

CJ331 - Research Design and Data Analysis in the Social Sciences

An introduction to research design, social measurement, analytic strategies and applied statistical techniques relevant to the interpretation of social phenomena. Cross-listed with HI/PS/PY/SO331.

CJ350 - Policing in a Democracy

An examination of the relationship between law enforcement and American society with emphasis on the importance of police-community relations and the constitutional limits on law enforcement agencies.

CJ360 - Special Problems

Independent study or research on a subject of interest to an individual student. May be taken for 1-5 credit hours.

CJ368 - Internship and Field Experiences

May be taken for 1-5 credit hours.

CJ390 - Special Topics

Advanced course on a topic not included in the regular curriculum. May be taken for 1-5 credit hours.

CJ480 - Senior Thesis

(Capstone) Seminar in which students complete the research and writing of a Senior thesis which must be successfully defended before the faculty of the Division of Social Sciences.

CL500 Introduction to Clinical Counseling

This course is an introduction into the field of clinical counseling. Students enter graduate-level counselor-education programs from a variety of educational and experiential backgrounds. A graduate with a Master’s degree in Clinical Counseling can be employed in a multitude of settings. The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to some of the knowledge and skills a counselor needs to know, to some of the areas in which the counselor can apply these skills, and to some of the theories and ethical issues important to the professional counselor. Core (CSR, I)

CL501 Diagnosis and Psychopathology

This course will provide an in-depth review of the assessment process that is used in the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. The course will provide a historical perspective on abnormal behavior and its definition as well as a review of the diagnostic and assessment phase of psychological disorders and various theories that look for the causes of abnormal behavior. This course will further develop the ability of the student to identify diagnostic criteria of the various disorders that a professional counselor may be asked to treat. Core (CSR, J)

CL505 Career Development

This course provides an in-depth look at the theoretical and conceptual approaches, and the assessment techniques used in career counseling. This will include the assessment of career interests, work skills, career decision making, career beliefs, work values, and career decision making. Core (CSR, F)

CL510 Counseling Theory

This course will explore various theories in the field of professional counseling. It will look at personality dynamics, treatment factors, and specific treatment techniques of each theory. Core (CSR, A)

CL512 Foundations of Sexuality in Counseling

This courses addresses the practice theories and techniques for assessment, evaluation, and treatment of sexual concerns (including: sexuality concerns, sexual exploration, physical/emotional intimacy, disability, chronic illness, pain, and sexual difficulties). Variations in human sexual function and expression will be discussed from physiological and socio-cultural viewpoints. Core (CSR, D)

CL514 Behavioral Emergencies and Crisis Intervention

This course will address the theories and techniques for the evaluation and management of behavioral emergencies and of other crises that confront counseling clients and individuals in the community. Behavior emergencies explored include suicide, violence, grave risk to defenseless victims, and drug or health-related states of impaired judgment. Other crises explored include grief and loss, sexual assault, terrorism, natural disasters, and provider burnout. Core (CSR, I & D)

CL520 Introduction to Psychological Measurement

The purpose of this course is to help the counseling student develop an understanding of the assessment process and an overview of the different areas of counseling and psychological evaluation and the different tests used in those areas. The course does not teach test administration and scoring. Core (CSR, G)

CL524 Counseling Across the Lifespan

This course examines the nature of the developmental process, from birth to death. The course will look at biological, psychological, and sociological aspects of development. The course will review developmental theories in each area and the educational needs of individuals at different points of their lives. Core (CSR, B)

CL525 Legal and Ethical Issues in Counseling

The purpose of this course is to familiarize the prospective counselor with the code of ethics, legal standards, licensing, role identity of counselors versus other helping professionals, fee structures, and the impact of fees on the counseling profession. No information in this course is a legal opinion. The instructor is not a lawyer. The information given in this course is intended solely to increase the counseling student’s awareness of some of the issues in the field. Core (CSR, I)

CL527 Foundations of Addictions Counseling

This course will focus on historical and cultural patterns of addictions and addictive behaviors, knowledge and attitude toward chemical abuse, theories of chemical dependency, and recognition and identification of addictions. Core (CSR, D)

CL530 Individual Intelligence Assessment

The focus of this course will be the administration, scoring, and interpretation of individual intelligence tests. The student will study the nature of intelligence, theories of intelligence, behavioral observation skills, and the importance of the clinical interview. There will be labs in which the student will learn to administer specific intelligence tests. The course will focus on the Wechsler scales. Elective (CSR, G)

CL535 Techniques of Interviewing

This course is designed to help the student develop the interview and communication skills necessary for a counselor to establish a helping relationship with a client. The counselor must be able to gather information, identify problems, complete a psychosocial history, and formulate a treatment plan. Core (CSR, D)

CL542 Social and Cultural Diversity in Counseling

This course is designed to provide students with a didactic theoretical and experiential learning environment that will challenge them to (a) critically conceptualize the cultural awareness of self and others; (b) identify sociopolitical influences involved in oppression and privilege; (c) examine specific cultural issues of non-majority populations; (d) explore the research, theoretical models, and techniques to enhance counseling skills and level of multicultural competency; (e) and identify counseling implications when working with diverse populations. Core (CSR, C)

CL544 Advanced Counseling with Evidence Based Therapies

This course emphasizes using research/professional literature, in combination with an understanding of a client to aid in choosing effective therapy. The course begins with an explanation of evidence-based therapies. Four specific therapies will be examined at depth: Cognitive-behavioral therapy for anxiety disorders; interpersonal therapy for depressive disorders, exposure therapy for PTSD, and integrated therapy for co-occurring disorders. A review of those four therapies will include the history of the theory behind the therapy, an explanation of the components of the therapy, evidence for efficacy, and experiential exposure to the techniques and protocols of the therapy. Core (CSR, D)

CL546 Neurobiology and Psychopharmacology in Counseling

An introductory level course on neurobiology and psychopharmacology for students preparing for a career in counseling, this course introduces the nervous system and how/why the body acts as it does on drugs. The pharmacodynamics & pharmacokinetics for each major class of psychotropic medications is covered along with the psychosocial treatments recommended to be concurrent with medications. Approaches to talking with clients about medication and medication compliance are presented as are models for collaborating with prescribing professionals. Other topics introduced are social and cultural issues that impact responses to psychotropic medication; research on common medication issues for children, the elderly, and individuals with alcohol or drug-related disorders; and current research on the use of herbaceuticals. The course concludes with an examination of the neurobiology of sleep, of attachment in the psychotherapy relationship, and of wellness. Core (CSR, D)

CL548 Foundations of Marriage, Couples, and Family Counseling

This course introduces students to a broad range of theories of marriage, couples, and family therapy. Cognitive-Behavioral Theory, as it is applied to couples and families, and a theory of relationship enhancement are examined in detail. Throughout the course, assignments will enable students to apply theoretical concepts and develop therapy skills. Core (CSR, D)

CL550 Research Methodology

This course is designed to familiarize the student with a variety of research methodologies that may be used in conducting research in the counseling field. Core (CSR, H)

CL552 Group Counseling Techniques

This course will provide an overview of group theories and the basic elements of the group process. This course will be didactic and experiential in nature and will provide the student with the opportunity to practice interventions in a small group setting. Core (CSR, E)

CL557 Current Issues and Supervision in Clinical Counseling

This course will provide a synopsis of the Clinical Counseling program as well as offering a lead into the practicum experience. An examination of current issues in counseling, licensure, legislation, affiliation, supervision, and an understanding of the public and private practice domain will be investigated. Elective (CSR, I)

CL560 Special Problems

1-3 hours. An independent study or research course for an individual student that may cover a wide range of topics in clinical counseling. Prerequisite is permission of instructor. Elective.

CL563 Counselor Practicum I

In this course, students will learn and develop counseling skills, initial diagnostic competencies, client record keeping, and the formation of treatment plans through a combination of lecture, demonstration, experiential activities, and guided practices. Students will receive supervised experience in counseling and interview evaluation, including use of audio and video tapes, and client and supervisor feedback. The student must be supervised at the ratio of at least one (1) hour of one-to-one supervision for every ten (10) hours of experience in the setting. Each student is required to complete three (3) semester credit hours of practicum. For each three (3) credit hours, the student must log a minimum of 40 clock hours of direct service with actual clients and 60 hours of indirect counseling, for a total of at least 100 training clock hours, before moving on into their internship phase. The practicum experience is set in both a classroom and a clinical field setting. Core (CSR, K)

CL564 Counselor Practicum II

Students in the MS Clinical Counseling program are required to complete a learning practica of 100 hours before moving on into their internship phase. Counseling Practicum II offers an additional opportunity to fulfill practica hours. See PY563, above, for the course description and requirements. This is an elective section of practica. (CSR, K)

CL573 Counseling Internship I

Internship is an intensive counseling experience that provides the student with the opportunity to perform a variety of counseling activities expected of a professional mental health counselor. Students will learn and develop counseling skills, initial diagnostic competencies, client record keeping, and the formation of treatment plans through a combination of lecture, demonstration, experiential activities, and guided practices. Students will receive supervised experience in counseling and interview evaluation, including use of audio and video tapes, and client and supervisor feedback. In the field placement portion of the internship, the student will work under the direct supervision of a professional who is a licensed professional counselor, a licensed psychologist, a licensed psychiatrist, or a licensed social worker. If a student is employed where they do their internship, the students’ employment hours and responsibilities cannot be counted toward their internship hours and responsibilities. The student must be supervised at the ratio of at least one (1) hour of one-to-one supervision for every ten (10) hours of experience in the field setting. Each student is required to complete six (6) semester credit hours of internship, within which he or she must log a minimum of 240 clock hours of direct service with actual clients and 360 hours of indirect counseling, for a total of at least 600 training clock hours. The internship experience may be broken up into 2-3 graduate credit hours per semester, depending on agreement between advisor and student. Internship is set in both a classroom and a clinical field setting. Core (CSR, K)

CL574 Counseling Internship II

2-3 hours. PY574 is a continuation of PY573; see PY573, above, for the course description and requirements. Core (CSR, K)

CL575 Counseling Internship III

2-3 hours. See PY573 for a description of the course contents and course requirements. This is an elective section of internship. (CSR, K)

CL590 Professional Clinical Development Seminars

-3 hours. The seminars cover a wide range of clinical topics including but not limited to state licensure, supervision, and working with a multitude of populations. These courses are designed to assist in the development and enhancement of the professional counselor identity. Elective.

CL595 Thesis Research

This course will provide an opportunity for students to establish and turn in a proposal for topic approval, acquire approval and begin the research process for master thesis as well as provide regular supervision during the process. Elective (CSR, H)

CL597 Master Thesis

The completion of a master’s thesis gives the counseling student the opportunity to extend and expand their knowledge of the counseling field and pursue proficiency on the journey to their Ph.D. The individual will integrate their knowledge of counseling, report writing, and research methodology, along with quantitative and qualitative analysis methodologies. Elective (CSR, H).

CL598 Thesis Continuation

This course provides students with continuing support in completing their research thesis. Elective (CSR, H)

CMU103 Orientation to Online Learning

This course provides an intensive introduction to the online learning program at Central Methodist University. It includes an introduction to myCMU, CMU’s learning management system (LMS), which is the basis for the delivery of online courses at CMU, an exploration of the requirements for success in online learning (which may be quite different from the things that make for success in on ground classes), and a review of the academic resources available to online students at myCMU.

CMU201 Introduction to Leadership

This interdisciplinary course provides an introduction to leadership principles and theories using a combination of case studies, historical perspectives, and personal experience with effective leaders. By the end of the course, students should understand individual and group leadership issues and be able to identify personal leadership qualities to apply in their lives. ROTC students may substitute MSL220 and MSL222.

CMU420 IDS Capstone

Open only to seniors majoring in Interdisciplinary Studies. This is a Senior Capstone course. To receive credit in the course, students must complete an analysis of their areas of study as related to their intended occupation or vocation and write a research essay summarizing the benefits of the interdisciplinary work with their potential employment opportunities or another project of equivalent academic depth and rigor agreed upon by faculty and student.

course

CS121 - Introduction to MS Office

Introduction to Windows. MS Word, MS Excel and MS PowerPoint, along with MS Outlook. This course is project-oriented with an eye towards outcomes-based objectives.

CS122AW - Computers in an Academic World

In depth coverage of Word, Excel and PowerPoint. Document integration between the software will be integral. Also, document sharing, index creation, outline creation, etc. CS122 may be taken in more than one content area, but only two hours will count towards a degree.

CS122SC - Computers in Science

The use of computers and programmable/graphing calculator operation and their interfacing with scientific instrumentation. Students are introduced to writing and using Quick Basic programs. Significant attention is given to the use of Excel, Word, and PowerPoint in the collection, manipulation and presentation of scientific information. CS122 may be taken in more than one content area, but only two hours will count towards a degree

CS130 - Intro to Computer Science

This course is an introductory course in Computer Science. All the major topics of computer science are surveyed: History of Computers and Computing, Data Representation, Data Manipulation, Operating Systems, Networking, Algorithms, Programming Languages, Application Development, Data Structures, and Databases. The purpose of this course is to give the student a good grounding in Computer Science in preparation for higher level courses

CS172 - .NET 1

A study of structured programming using C++ #.NET including: introduction to the programming environment, algorithmic development, problem solving, and an introduction to data abstraction. Emphasis is placed on program design and documentation.

CS214 - Web Page Design

An introduction to the fundamentals of web page design. Use of HTML and CSS to plan and create web pages that combine text, images, and other multimedia to design clean, easy-to-use pages that support the content.

CS216 - Web Programming

Students will learn the basics of web communication protocols and HTML file formats. Then students will write programs to submit web requests and process responses automatically. Several different web programs and web bots will be created during this class to illustrate the different techniques of web programming.

CS231 - Scientific Computer Programming

Introduction to the FORTRAN programming language and other languages with examples chosen from science and mathematics. Prerequisite: One programming course or division chair's permission.

CS236 - Programming in Visual Basic

Program development using Visual Basic.NET Topics include: language statements, Visual Basic objects in forms, menus, dialog boxes, multiple forms, file management, and accessing databases. A toolkit of objects such as buttons, text boxes, and labels are used to build programs.

CS237 - Programming with Java

Students will learn to program using the Java language. They will explore the strengths and weaknesses of Java. Students will examine how to do input and output, branching and iteration, make calculations, save and execute Java programs. At the end of the course, students should be able to create various Java applications.

CS271 - .NET II

Continuing the study of structured programming using C#.NET including: algorithmic development, problem solving, interfacing with databases, and an introduction to graphics. Emphasis is placed on program design and documentation.

CS272 - Survey of Programming Languages

This course will briefly look at six to eight languages, comparing and contrasting their strengths and weaknesses. Several structured languages like C++, Pascal, Java, and C# will be surveyed along with assembler, and AI languages like LISP or Prolog, and COBOL. Because of the brief treatment of each language, students are not expected to be proficient at any of the languages but should be able to recognize and understand code and the strengths and weaknesses of each language.

CS275 - Mobile Application Development

A study of the process by which applications are developed for handheld devices such as smart phones, pads, or tablets.

CS320 - Computers in the Mathematics Classroom

This course is designed to prepare mathematics educators to write mathematical documents that are of publishable quality. Students will also be instructed in the use of current mathematical software that includes, but may not be limited to, Geogebra and Desmos.

CS362 - Database Systems and SQL

An introduction to database concepts, data models, database normalization, data description languages, query facilities, database security, data integrity and reliability, and SQL.

CS363 - Digital Communications-Networking

A study of data communications, network structure design and architecture network standards and services using the OSI model. Emphasis in NOVELL and NT architectures

CS368 - Internship and Field Experience

May be taken for 1-6 credit hours

CS371 - Concepts of MIS

This course will investigate the system development cycle. Stress will be placed on system documentation describing process flow, data flows, data structures, file design, input and output, and program specification. A significant class project will illustrate concepts.

CS375 - Game Programming

This course builds on content from prior computer science courses and incorporates programming fundamentals with the topics of graphics, animation, data structures, and web programming. Several game projects, from simple to more complex, will be examined and coded. Issues like player input, calculations, and presentation, along with real-time versus turn-based, will be discussed

CS377 - Computer Architecture and Operating Systems

A study of computer structure and machine language, assembly language, addressing techniques, File I/O, program segmentation, linkage, and operating systems.

CS378 - Data Structures and Algorithms

A study of algorithms and data structures. Topics will include the following: data structures, abstract data types, recursion, algorithm analysis, sorting and searching.

CS379 - Computer and Information Security

An introduction to Computer and Information Security. Major threats, vulnerabilities and countermeasures in the area of Information security are explored. Management strategies and challenges to addressing security issues are also explored.

CS390 - Special Topics

May be taken for 1-3 credit hours

CS480-Senior Thesis

A capstone course tailored to the individual student's needs. Special projects will be used to extend the areas of interest.

CT101 - Public Speaking

Students study the theory of speech communication to develop skills in public-speaking situations. Topics include the speech-communication process, ethics, listening, intercultural considerations, speech-topic selection, audience analysis, research, use of evidence in a speech, speech organization, language usage, speech delivery, presentation aids, and the types of public speaking. Students present introductory, impromptu, commemorative, informative, and persuasive speeches as well as group presentations to improve their public-speaking skills Required of all students and must be taken during the first three semesters of enrollment at CMU.   MOTR COMM 110 Fundamentals of Public Speaking Core 42 Website

CT201 - Public Relations

Students study the role, process, strategy, tactics, and application of public relations in the corporate, governmental, political, non-profit, sports, entertainment, and travel fields. Topics include the history of public relations, ethics, careers in public relations, public opinion, persuasion, conflict management, and legal issues. Students learn how to research, plan, communicate, and evaluate a public-relations campaign. Students create news releases, media alerts, media kits, pitch letters, audio news releases, video news releases, speeches, and other public-relations tactics.

CT205 - Public Relations Writing

Students learn and practice the skills necessary for success in the many forms of modern public relations. Students develop skills in researching, writing, editing, and recording for public relations through the study of and creation of public-relation tools such as annual reports, audio news releases, brochures, media alerts, media kits, news releases, opinion-editorial pieces, press releases, pitch letters, public service announcements, speeches, and video news releases. Students also learn critical-thinking skills by using audience analysis to target the message for the intended audience or public. Student work will result in a public-relations portfolio.

CT230 - Mass Media

Students study the history and effects of mass media, including books, magazines, newspapers, music, movies, radio, television, blogs, social media, and other internet-based media. Topics include mass media theories and how they apply to areas in the media such as advertising, journalism, and public relations. Students read and discuss important topics and current trends in mass media. Odd-numbered springs.

CT232 Audio Production

Students study how to research, write, edit, record, and broadcast in audio-based media such as radio, music, television, film, and the internet. Topics include the equipment and programs used in audio production, the use of sound effects and music, voice-overs and narration, audio mixing, and news and sports broadcasting. Students will record and broadcast public-service announcements, news reports, sports broadcasts, music productions, and other productions contained within the field. This course requires of the student a two-hour shift on the campus radio station. Fall.

CT234 Video Production

Students study how to research, write, edit, and record video for use in television, film, and the internet. Topics include the equipment and programs used in video production, video shooting and editing, and video production in news, entertainment, and sports broadcasts. Students will shoot, edit, and produce short videos for use in several formats such as promotional announcements, commercials, music videos, and interviews. Fall and Spring.

CT260.360.460 Special Problems

1-5 hours. Independent study or research on a subject of interest to an individual student.

CT265 - Media Convergencecourse

Students study the evolving interconnectedness of the types of media. Topics include the creation of content for use in print, audio, video, and internet-based media such as blogs, podcasting, and social-networking websites. Students learn research, writing, producing, and editing skills for all types of media.

CT268.368.468 Internship and Field Experiences

1-5 hours.

CT290.390.490 Special Topics

1-5 hours. Intermediate-level course on a topic not included in the regular curriculum.

CT306 - Media Law

Students study the law as it relates to the First Amendment, journalism, and business. Topics include political speech, obscenity, campus speech, defamation, privacy, news, broadcasting, intellectual property, advertising, and public relations. Students investigate, discuss, and debate the issues surrounding these topics.

CT310 - Argumentation and Debate

Students study the elements and process of forming arguments and debates. Topics include the types of debates; use of evidence and reasoning; and researching, organizing, writing, presenting, and evaluating debates. Students improve their critical thinking, speaking, and advocacy skills by researching important issues of the day and transforming that information into a persuasive, logical argument.

CT320 Interpersonal Communication

Students study the different methods of analyzing the self and one-on-one relationships within the context of interpersonal communication. Topics include the communication process, perception, self-concept, cultural effects, gender effects, emotions, language, listening techniques, verbal and nonverbal communication, intimacy, power, interpersonal conflict, and relational communication. Discussion, journal entries, in-class activities, and outside assignments help students understand and assess their interpersonal communication skills

CT325 - Advanced Public Speaking

Students study the theory of speech communication to further develop their skills in researching, writing, and presenting speeches in public-speaking situations. Topics include the types of speeches, methods of delivery, persuasive theory, persuasive techniques, rhetorical criticism, political speeches, and interviewing skills. Students present individual informative, persuasive, and special-occasion speeches as well as group presentations.

CT330 Business Communication

Students study written and oral communication used in for-profit, non-profit, and governmental organizations. Topics include the writing of memoranda, proposals, reports, speeches, résumés, cover letters, and grants. Students improve their writing, speaking, leadership, team-building, and interviewing skills through discussion, assignments, and external class projects.

CT331 - Research Design and Data Analysis in the Social Sciences

An introduction to research design, social measurement, analytic strategies and applied statistical techniques relevant to the interpretation of social phenomena. Cross-listed with CJ/HI/PS/PY/SO331.

CT345 Small-Group Communication

Students study the theories and processes of small-group communication. Topics include group development, problem-solving, and decision-making; leadership; listening; conflict resolution; and virtual groups. In-class discussion, group exercises, projects, and presentations help students improve their leadership, team-building, and presentation skills.

CT386 - Media Planning

Students learn how to research, plan, execute, and evaluate a media plan for an organization. Topics include different types of media, audience measurement, measurement tools, evolving technologies, market segmentation, media strategy, media buying, and evaluation techniques. Students use the knowledge learned through readings and in-class discussion to create a comprehensive media plan for a real or hypothetical organization

CT388 - Public Relations Campaigns

Students study public-relations campaigns to learn how decision-makers in the public and private sectors research, plan, execute, and evaluate communication campaigns. Topics include cases in media relations, internal communications, community relations, public affairs, governmental relations, investor relations, consumer relations, and international public relations. Students use their knowledge of public-relations theories, strategies, and techniques to create a public-relations campaign for an existing or hypothetical organization. Students also study events used in campaigns as a form of promotion for individuals, organization, products, or places. Topics include the planning, implementation, promotion, and evaluation of events. Students plan an event as part of a public-relations campaign

CT480 - Senior Thesis

This is the capstone course for Communication majors. Open only to juniors and seniors majoring in Communication. This course is a Senior thesis seminar. Students must complete either (1) a directed research paper or (2) an approved audio/video project with a written research component and defend it before the faculty of the Division of Social Sciences.

Digital Citizenship

This course explores the responsibility of being a good citizen online and aims to produce productive and socially responsible digital citizens.

EC101 General Economics

A one-semester survey of economics course covering both macroeconomics and microeconomics. This course is designed to meet the needs of students who are not majoring in accounting or business. This course will cover basic ideas from both microeconomics and macroeconomics but without using the traditional textbook approach that relies on a substantial amount of mathematics and graphing. It is designed to meet the needs of education majors who are required to take a course in economics. (Students pursuing a Business Education concentration are required to take EC201 and EC202.) MOTR ECON 100 Introduction to Economics Core 42 Website

EC190 Special Topics

Variable credit hours, 1-3 hours. Introductory course on a topic not included in the regular curriculum.

EC201 Macroeconomics

Following an initial introduction to important general economic concepts, including demand and supply, the course examines the U.S. economy from a macro-economic perspective. It includes an analysis of (1) how unemployment, inflation, and Gross Domestic Product are measured, (2) different theories of why the economy goes through cyclical fluctuations (recessions and booms) in the short-run, (3) long-run economic growth, and (4) the use of monetary and fiscal policies to stabilize the economy. MOTR ECON 101 Introduction to MacroeconomicsCore 42 Website

EC202 Microeconomics

Following an initial introduction to important general economic concepts, including demand and supply, the course examines the U.S. economy from a micro-economic perspective. It includes an analysis of (1) the theory of consumer behavior, (2) elasticity, (3) costs and supply, (4) market structure, (5) anti-trust law and regulation, and (6) factor markets. MOTR ECON 102 Introduction to Microeconomics Core 42 Website

EC260 Special Problems

Variable credit hours, 1-3 hours. Independent study or research on a subject of interest to an individual student.

EC268 Internship and Field Experiences

Variable credit hours, 1-5 hours.

EC290 Special Topics

Variable credit hours, 1-3 hours. Intermediate-level course on a topic not included in the regular curriculum.

EC311 Money, Credit, and Banking

Examination of the role of money, financial markets, and financial intermediation in the American economy, with a particular focus on commercial banks. Includes an in-depth look at the money supply process and the Federal Reserve System.

EC314 Managerial Economics

Intermediate microeconomics with a focus on applications of Economics to decisions made by managers of a firm, including the concepts of demand analysis and forecasting, production and cost analysis, and pricing and output decisions.

EC316 Intermediate Macroeconomics

This course builds on the material covered in EC201. After reviewing basic macro-economic concepts, it looks at different models of how the aggregate economy functions in both the short-run and the long-run, (including Keynesian, monetarist, supply-side, and real business cycle models). It also looks at the use of monetary and fiscal policies to stabilize the economy.

EC330 Law and Economics

Use of the tools of micro-economic analysis to investigate the legal system of the United States. A variety of specific topics are covered, including property rights, contracts, family law, tort law, criminal law, anti-trust law and regulation.

EC347 International Economics

Examination of the economic interdependence among the nations of the world. The first half of the semester covers the theory of international trade and explores such issues as why nations trade with one another, the results of such trade, and the consequences of interfering with free trade with tariffs and quotas. The second half covers international finance and focuses on the determination of exchange rates, the balance of payments, and the international transmission of business cycles.

EC360 Special Problems

Variable credit hours, 1-3 hours. Independent study or research on a subject of interest to an individual student.

EC368 Internship and Field Experiences

Variable credit hours, 1-5 hours.

EC390 Special Topics

Variable credit hours, 1-3 hours. Advanced course on a topic not included in the regular curriculum.

ED101

A study of the historical, philosophical, legal, and social development of education in the United States with an emphasis on cultural diversity and ELL as they affect students, faculty, and the education system as a whole.

ED102 Field Experience I

Applied experience (18 clock hours) working with students and observing teachers in a classroom setting.

ED103 Child Development

The study of the physical, motor, intellectual, social, and emotional development of the young child as well as the development of an intelligent philosophy of adult-child relationships. This course includes 10-12 clock hours of clinical experiences.

ED105 Field Experience II

Applied experiences (12 clock hours) working with students and observing teachers in a classroom setting. Available in 1, 0.5, or 1 credit hour

ED122 Education Technology

This course will introduce students to a number of current technologies, both hardware- and software-based, with the intent of enhancing the presentation of materials and the sharing and collaboration of information. The course will include material concerning related social, ethical, and legal issues surrounding technology.

ED204 Utilizing Family and Community Resources

The cooperation between home, school, and community to provide a supportive educational environment for the young child. Includes community exploration from an historical, philosophical, and social perspective; basic principles related to community resources; various child-rearing and parenting styles; and methods of utilizing and communicating with families and the community. Cultural and socioeconomic factors, and the realities of the changing family and variations among parent education program types are considered.

ED206 Infant and Toddler Curriculum Methods and Materials

Introduction to various curriculum methods for children aged six weeks through two years. Current issues in infant/toddler care will be discussed.

ED207 Infant and Toddler Curriculum Methods and Materials Practicum

The clinical experience (24-36 clock hours) includes observation of infants and toddlers and participation in planning and conducting learning experiences appropriate for infants and toddlers.

ED260 Special Problems

Variable Credit hours: 1-5. Independent study or research on a subject of interest to an individual student.

ED264 Child Health

This course focuses on children ages birth through 16 and the health issues that affect them. The areas of focus for this course are functions and interrelationships of systems, health maintenance and enhancement, risk assessment and reduction, efficiency of human movement and performance, and physical activity and lifetime wellness. This content is consistent with the Missouri Subject-Specific Competencies for Early Childhood and Elementary Education.

ED290 Special Topics

Variable Credit Hours: 1-5. Intermediate-level course on a topic not included in the regular curriculum.

ED303 Methods and Materials for Teaching Content Classes

Presents methods and materials for integrating social studies and science concepts required in elementary classrooms, including those identified as Show-Me Standards and Project Construct Goals by the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education.

ED304 Methods and Materials for Teaching Content Classes Practicum

This clinical experience (20 clock hours) includes observation and participation in planning, implementing, and documenting learning experiences in an elementary classroom. Attention is given to an integrated curricular approach.

ED308 Organization and Administration of Early Childhood Programs

The development and enhancement of strategies for developing, organizing, and administering quality early childhood programs.

ED313 Classroom Behavior Management in the Middle and Secondary Classroom

This course is designed to acquaint pre-service middle-school and secondary-school teachers with strategies for classroom and behavior management. Students will address such topics as creating social relationships in the classroom, increasing student motivation, minimizing disruptive behavior, and understanding the effects of classroom management on behavior and learning.

ED314 History, Philosophy, and Curriculum of Middle-Level Education

Study of the historical background, philosophy, organization, and curriculum of middle-level education, including discussion of teaching techniques and practices that best serve middle-level students. Areas of emphasis are teaming, advisor/advisee programs and co-curricular, extra-curricular, and instructional methods.

ED315 Reading and Writing with Young Children

Basic foundations of reading development. Includes current research, theories, techniques, and materials that meet both individual and group needs in oral and written language. Emphasis on the integration of the language arts: reading, writing, speaking and listening. Developing and sharing instructional methodology for diverse students is integral to this course. This course has 10 clock hours of clinical experiences.

ED318 Reading Assessment and Instruction

The study of formal and informal assessment as it relates to individual needs is a basic part of this course. Development of instructional plans with an emphasis on personalized reading strategies and continuous assessment is included.

ED319 Reading Assessment and Instruction Practicum

This practicum (18 clock hours) provides opportunities for pre-service teachers to practice reading strategies with elementary students.

ED320 Teaching Reading and Writing in the Middle School

The reading process and the application of reading and writing strategies in various content areas in the middle school.

ED324 Methods of Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary Middle School

Methods of teaching mathematical concepts recommended by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics as basic to an elementary and middle school curriculum. Based on research of learning theorists and successful classroom procedures. Includes mini-teaching experiences.

ED326 Childrens Literature

All genres of literature for children and adolescents are surveyed through synopses and reading of books by outstanding authors to acquaint the student with high quality stories and poems for use with children and adolescents. Multicultural literature is emphasized and methods of using literature in the classroom as well as techniques of storytelling are also studied. Extensive reading and active participation in class discussion are essential for this course. This course includes a minimal amount of clinical experiences.

ED327 Creative Arts

This course is designed to encourage observation, expression, and appreciation through creative activity while exploring music, drama, visual arts, and movement. Applied laboratory experiences are included. This course includes a minimal amount of clinical experiences.

ED329 Emergent Language

Examination of the oral and written language development of the young child. Factors that facilitate or inhibit language development will be discussed. Attention will be given to the sampling, analysis, and evaluation of a language user.

ED330 Curriculum Methods and Materials in Early Childhood Education

Introduction to various curriculum models for children aged three years through eight years. Early childhood education is explored from an historical and philosophical perspective. Current issues in the field are discussed.

ED331 Curriculum Methods and Materials in Early Childhood Education Practicum

The clinical experience (24 clock hours) includes observation of children in an accredited early childhood program, participation in planning and conducting activities under the supervision of teachers, and the construction of various teaching aids appropriate for young children.

ED332 Screening, Diagnosis, and Planning Instruction for Young Children

Introduction to various facets of assessing young children, including considerations of children who represent cultural, cognitive, and linguistic differences. Evaluation and administration of assessment instruments and interpretation of results, and educational recommendations are included.

ED333 Screening, Diagnosis, and Planning Instruction for Young Children Practicum

Laboratory (24 clock hours) experience in screening young children. Each student observes a child enrolled in an accredited or public school early childhood program for a semester and suggests developmentally appropriate goals for the child based on observation, assessments, and constructivist principles.

ED337 Classroom Organization and Curriculum Design

This course emphasizes the investigation and development of early childhood curriculum. Constructivist theory will be explored, together with alignment of emergent curriculum planning and developmentally appropriate practice, to provide for optimum physical, social, emotional, creative and cognitive growth of young children. Reflective planning will be utilized to design the physical and social-emotional characteristics necessary for effective classroom environments.

ED340 Implementing a Business Education Program

This course addresses information needed to plan, implement, and maintain Business Education programs.

ED341 Coordination of Cooperative Education

This course is a study of the principles and techniques used in coordinating work experiences for student learners. Included is a study of methods and materials, work site selection, placement, evaluation, and student follow-up.

ED350 Education Methodology

This course is the first in a series of three courses designed to introduce students to curriculum, assessment, student data, data-based decision making, and instructional strategies.

ED360 Special Problems

Variable credit hours 1-5 hours. Independent study or research on a subject of interest to an individual student.

ED369MU Elementary School Music Methods

Objectives, methods and material of teaching music in elementary schools, including singing, rhythmic, creative and listening experiences. This course includes a minimal amount of clinical experiences.

ED370 Teaching Methods in the Content Area

Either 2 or 3 Credit Hours. Offered in each middle and high school certification area, these courses consider methods, materials, and evaluation techniques based on current educational research and recommendations from the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. These courses may not be offered annually. Students should confer with their advisors to determine when these courses are offered and develop their degree or certification plans accordingly. This course includes 15 hours of clinical experience. Offered as the following sections: ED370BU Teaching Methods in Business. 3 hours. The problems, methods and materials of teaching business in the secondary schools. ED370EN Teaching Methods in English. 3 hours. The problems, methods and materials of teaching English in the secondary schools. Spring. ED370MA Teaching Methods of Mathematics. 3 hours. The problems, methods and materials of teaching mathematics in the secondary schools. Spring. ED370MU Teaching Methods of Music. 3 hours. The problems, methods and materials of teaching music in the secondary schools. Prerequisite: ED369. Fall. ED370MV Teaching Methods of Vocal Music. 2 hours. The problems, methods and materials of teaching music in the secondary schools. Prerequisite: ED369. Fall. ED370HE Teaching Methods in Health and Care of Injuries in K-12 Programs. 2 hours. This course is the study of materials and methods used to provide an innovative approach for effective health instruction as well as instruction in the care and prevention of athletic injury for students in grades K-12. ED370SC Teaching Methods of Science. 3 hours. Discussion, reading and practical examination of objectives, methods and equipment used in teaching fields of science in secondary and middle schools. Fall. ED370SS Teaching Methods of Social Science. 3 hours. Techniques in the teaching of social studies in the secondary schools. Spring. ED370ST Teaching Methods of Speech and Theatre. 3 hours. The problems, methods and materials of teaching speech and theatre in the secondary schools. Fall.

ED375 Autism Spectrum Disorder

This course focuses on a broad overview of autism, Asperger's syndrome and related autism spectrum disorders with particular emphasis on characteristics, definition, educational aspects, and contemporary issues in the field of special education. It is designed to provide students with a firm grounding in the foundations of teaching persons with autism and expose them to recent developments in the field. Content also includes methods to enhance classroom functioning and skill acquisition.

ED376 Methods and Materials for Teaching Music Classes

This course addresses the challenges, methods, and materials of teaching music in elementary and secondary schools. Students will investigate daily concerns faced by teachers and will learn how to plan for short- and long-term goals. A variety of topics will be covered specifically preparing the pre-service teacher for the student teaching experience.

ED378 Applied Behavior Analysis for Educators

This course focuses on identifying, recording, evaluating, and changing social and academic behaviors of special and diverse populations. Theories of classroom management will be explored and various approaches to management including use of technological advances will be addressed. Developing classroom and individual behavior management plans will be emphasized.

ED390 Special Topics

Variable credit hours 1-5 hours. Advanced course on a topic not included in the regular curriculum.

ED444 Early Childhood Experience

An experiential approach (124 + clock hours) to observe and practice teaching strategies with pre-school children in an accredited setting.

ED453 Education as a Profession

Expansion of knowledge, skills, and competencies of pre-service educators. Topics include: successful teacher characteristics and behaviors, communication, classroom management, assessment, job search preparation, and current societal, cultural, and legal issues in education.

ED454 Student Teaching Seminar Methods

In this course students will reflect on and share their observations and teaching experiences. They will also discuss current educational topics, curriculum development, legal issues, lesson planning, and classroom management.

ED462 Supervised Student Teaching

Variable credit hours 8-10 hours. (Capstone) The purpose of this experience is to first observe and then apply professional knowledge and skills in concert with a professional educator. The student will gradually assume responsibilities for all classroom and school duties under the guidance of the classroom teacher and a university supervisor. This course includes 12 to 16 weeks of clinical experiences. (Student teachers in vocal and instrumental music earn 8 hours and complete a minimum of 12 weeks; everyone else earns 10 hours and completes a minimum of 16 weeks.) Students must earn the qualifying score on the MEES (Missouri Educator Evaluation System) in order to earn a C or better in this course. Students may choose to accept a D grade but will not be recommended for certification without the appropriate MEES score and a C or better in ED462. Students who do not earn the qualifying MEES score may also choose to accept an incomplete grade and work with their university supervisor and the Director of Teacher Education on what improvements must be made to increase their score to the passing level. This course can only be repeated with the permission of the Director of Teacher Education.

ED468 Child Development Internship

This internship offers an alternative in the Child Development major for students who want a capstone experience in a non-school setting. Students will choose a placement that fits both their program of study and their career goals.

ED470 Instructional Interventions for Students with Reading Deficits

This course presents theoretical and pedagogical information about teaching reading to middle and secondary school students with reading deficits. Emphasis is placed on addressing the needs of culturally and linguistically diverse students, as well as students who require differentiated instruction to successfully read content material.

ED471 Reading and Writing in the Content Area

This course provides a study of teaching and learning situations in secondary schools and the application of reading and writing strategies in various content areas. Emphasizes preparation of materials for the classroom. This course includes 12 clock hours of clinical experience.

ED504 Current Issues and Trends in Education

This course focuses on the review and appraisal of contemporary trends and practices in education. Emphasis is placed on social and multicultural issues in American education. Educational theories and curricula will be critically analyzed within a variety of educational settings. Standard 3.

ED505 Liberal Arts in Education

This course requires students to focus on liberal arts once again in their academic studies. Students in this course will build both on their individual broad level of knowledge about education and their mastery of their specific teaching area of expertise or work skills. This course integrates liberal education, professional studies, and specialty studies. Meets MEd Standard 1.

ED507 Foundations of Education Administration

This course serves as part of the foundation for students choosing to pursue careers in elementary or secondary school administration, including athletic administration and coaching. Course content is based upon the unique challenges and demands faced by contemporary school leaders, and is both interactive and reflective. In addition to direct instruction the class will feature learning through case studies, class discussions, and personal reflection. Students will be challenged to assess their individual skills, talents, and potential as leaders, and then develop a professional improvement plan that moves them toward their goal of becoming school administrators. Topics include organizational theory and behavior, administrative theory and practice, decision-making, organizational communications, historical perspectives, and current issues and trends. Meets M.Ed. Standard 4.

ED508 Introduction to Cross-Categorical Abilities

Overview of information about students with disabilities and the interactions among societal, cultural, cognitive, psychological, and physical factors that impact people with disabilities. Meets MEd Standard 2.

ED509 Play and the Young Child

The role of play in the young child's learning will be the focus of the course. Course content will include theories of play, play intervention, observation of play, and various other aspects of theories regarding play and the young child. Meets MEd Standard 1.

ED510 History and Philosophy of Middle-Level Education

Study of the historical background, philosophy, organization, and curricular programs of middle-level education. First in this series of courses. Meets MEd Standard 1.

ED512 Middle-Level Curriculum and Instruction

Middle-level education and the teaching techniques and practices which serve best as delivery systems for the middle-level students. Areas of emphasis are teaming, advisor/advisee programs, co-curricular, extracurricular, and instructional methods. Meets MEd Standard 2.

ED513 Classroom Assessment

Classroom observation, interpretation, and research are the focus of this course. Students will be expected to practice and implement various techniques discussed in class as well as prepare documentation for explorations undertaken. Meets MEd Standard 4.

ED514 Instructional Technology

A project-based course in which students study the relationship between contemporary learning theories and classroom technology. Coursework encourages development of technology skills and a conceptual foundation that supports (a) continued life-long professional development, (b) potential technological leadership among peers and (c) new instructional technology perspectives. Addresses Missouri Standards for Teacher Education Programs (MoSTEP) competencies.

ED516 Exceptional and Diverse Learners

Basic concepts of multicultural education, with an emphasis on students from diverse cultural and ethnic backgrounds, as well the gifted and special needs student. Instruction includes a review of instructional strategies for the diverse classroom, a personal examination of one's bias and stereotypes, and the role of personal professional responsibility within a global society. Also addressed are the Missouri Standards for Teacher Education Programs and provisions of the No Child Left Behind Act.

ED518 Reading Assessment and Instruction

This course focuses on the study of formal and informal assessment as it relates to individual needs. Developing instructional plans with an emphasis on personalized reading strategies and continuous evaluation is included. Prerequisite: Coursework in Reading Foundations and Assessment preferred. Meets MEd Standard 2.

ED520 Teaching Reading in Middle Schools

The reading process and the application of reading and writing strategies in various content areas in the middle school. Meets MEd Standard 2.

ED523 Teacher Leadership

Issues of school improvement and reform will be discussed and evaluated. The concept of leadership will be explained using current theories, and different styles of leadership will be explored along with their effectiveness. Meets MEd Standard 5.

ED525 Theories of Child Development

The focus of this course will be an in-depth exploration of the theories of social/emotional, cognitive, and language development of the young child. The young child within the context of the family and culture will be considered. Meets MEd Standard 1.

ED532 Screening, Diagnosis, and Planning Instruction for Young Children

This course is designed to acquaint students in early childhood education with the various facets of assessing the needs of young children. The study will include consideration of children with significant cultural, cognitive, and linguistic differences, the administration, evaluation and interpretation of assessment instruments and their results, and making educational recommendations and their implementation. Prerequisite: Coursework in Child Development. Meets MEd Standard 4.

ED533 Classroom and Behavior Management

Organization, procedures, and management of the classroom including approaches to disciplinary problems. Meets MEd Standard 5.

ED538 Issues in Special Education

This course provides an overview of special education issues relative to U.S. society. It presents a multi-faceted range of opinions about how, where, and why we educate persons with disabilities. Meets MEd Standard 1.

ED539 Issues and Trends in Curriculum

This course is designed to provide students with information concerning issues and trends in curriculum. Topics will include the history and evolution of curriculum use, curriculum development, connecting curriculum and assessments, practical use of curriculum, and how it fits into our current state and national achievement responsibilities. Meets MEd Standard 1.

ED541 Power of Engaged Learning

This course will lead students to research, discuss, and apply the "power of engaged learning" on effective teaching and learning processes using technology. Meets MEd Standard 2.

ED543 Software for Students

A project-based course in which the students will increase their competency in the integration of software use by all students within their present curriculum and improve their ability to integrate software into future units of study. Meets MEd Standard 3.

ED544 Software for Teachers

A project-based course in which the students will increase their competencies in the use of technologies that support classroom instruction and enhance professional practice. Meets MEd Standard 3.

ED545 Web Page Design

This course is designed to provide educators with the necessary knowledge and skills to design educational web pages. Free and open source text editors such as Adobe Brackets and Notepad++ will be used in conjunction with Mozilla Firefox to create web pages. Meets MEd Standard 3.

ED547 Introduction to Interscholastic and Intercollegiate Athletic Program Administration I

Students will become familiar with the organizational roles and responsibilities of the athletic administrator in programs ranging from high school to the intercollegiate level. Learner outcomes will be aligned with both the Missouri State High School Activities Association and the National Interscholastic Athletic Administration Standards. Meets MEd Standard 1.

ED548 Interscholastic and Intercollegiate Athletic Program Administration II

This seminar further identifies and explores the organizational roles and responsibilities of the athletic administrator. The course focuses on current events impacting both high school and intercollegiate athletics, the administrations of interscholastic athletes, athletics and the law, legal considerations, cautions and issues. Meets MEd Standard 1.

ED549 Interscholastic and Intercollegiate Athletic Program Administration III

This seminar further identifies and explores the organizational roles and responsibilities of the athletic administrator. This course will focus on current events impacting both high school and intercollegiate athletics, the administrations of interscholastic athletes, athletics, athletics and the law, legal considerations, cautions and issues (including anti-trust issues, amateur sports issues, Title IX issues, labor issues, tort law issues), and the role of state high school association now and in the future. Meets MEd Standard 1.

ED550 The Role of the Collegiate Athletic Director

This course will identify the organizational roles and responsibilities of the athletic administrator. The coursework will highlight the roles and responsibilities of the Intercollegiate Athletic Director and/or Administrator in the collegiate divisions of the NAIA, NCAA, NJCAA, USCAA and NCCAA. Meets MEd Standard 1.

ED551 Methods and Materials in Mathematics Education

Students examine and create materials, which are useful in teaching mathematics. Effective teaching techniques such as learning-by-doing are demonstrated and the educational theories and research literature which support these techniques will be discussed. Meets MEd Standard 2.

ED560 Special Problems

1-3 hours. Independent study or research on a subject of interest to an individual student.

ED561 Instructional Strategies

Designed to assist the student in recognizing instructional strategies and selecting strategies appropriate to the student population. Various instructional strategies are explored. Meets MEd Standard 3.

ED572 Teaching Reading in the Content Area

This course provides a study of teaching and learning situations in the elementary and secondary schools with the application of reading and writing strategies in various content areas and specialties, including core contents, electives, and library sciences. Learners extend their content area reading as they engage in the language arts practice of reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Meets MEd Standard 2.

ED590 Special Topics

1-3 hours. This course provides opportunity to research literature and produce a project regarding an educational issue on an individual basis to meet students' needs and interests.

ED595 Introduction to Research

This course is designed to familiarize the student with a variety of methodologies in educational research. Students will select an area of interest for secondary research.

ED596 Final Project

Every student must successfully complete ED596 to fulfill the research requirement for the Master of Education degree. Students complete their project with the instructor's guidance. This project includes practical research, a literature review, and a presentation. Students who do not complete the project during this term of enrollment will receive a grade of "I" (Incomplete) for the course. Students who receive a grade of Incomplete must maintain a continuous enrollment of at least 1-hour each term (except summer) until the thesis is completed or the six-year time for program completion has expired.

ED598 Project Continuation

This course provides students with continuing support in completing their research project.

ED618 Educational Assessment - Assessing Student Learning in the Classroom

This is an existing VESi course which is currently available to all CMU graduate students. Meets MEd Standard 4.

EN105 Introducation to World Literature

The reading and critical discussion of literary works, including works of fiction, poetry, and drama from ancient times to contemporary. Emphasis on understanding, appreciation, and analysis of great works of literature.

EN110 College Composition

EN110 focuses on techniques of topic development, drafting, and revision to help students write clear, concise sentences, paragraphs, and essays. EN110 is also the study of grammar, syntax, and diction and their relationship to effective writing. Required of all students who score 19 or below on ACT English subscore. Must be taken during first two semesters of enrollment. MOTR ENGL 100 Composition I Core 42 Website  

EN111 - College Composition II

EN111 focuses on techniques of topic development, drafting, and revision to help students write clear, concise sentences, paragraphs, and essays. EN111 is also the study of grammar, syntax, and diction and their relationship to effective writing. Required of all students who score 19 or below on their ACT English subscore or who took EN110 or its equivalent

EN120 - College Composition I and II

Required of all freshmen who do not take the EN110/EN111 option and prerequisite to all other courses in English, EN120 focuses students on learning to develop organizational patterns (e.g. narration, process, comparison, definition, and cause and effect). Students will practice these patterns through writing several essays, including a research essay. EN120 is also the study of grammar, syntax, and diction and their relationship to effective writing. Required of all Freshmen who score 20 or above on their ACT English subscore. Must be taken during the first two semesters of enrollment.

EN190 - Special Topics

This is an introductory course on a topic not included in the regular curriculum. May be taken for 1-5 credit hours

EN211 - Grammar for Educators

This course will introduce students to the basics of English grammar. Students will learn how to identify parts of speech, analyze sentences, and recognize the conventions of Standard American English. This course will prepare students for upper-level coursework in teaching language arts, assessing language development, and linguistic study.

EN212 - Introduction to Cinema

The class examines themes, impacts, and techniques in cinematic art. Through experiencing, reading about, and discussing a series of films, the class studies the history of film, the major film genres, and some of the important film directors. Fulfills "Fine Arts" requirements.

EN216 - Introduction to Creative Writing

This course explores students' writing in creative forms, including short fiction, drama, and verse.

EN222 - Introduction to Literature

This course introduces students to the study of literature, developing essential skills in critical thinking, textual analysis, and composing in multiple modalities. Through an investigation of literary genres and/or movements, student will also explore a variety of cultural and/or historical contexts, expanding students’ engagement with, understanding of, and respect for the diverse human experience

EN224 - Topics-Movements in Literature

This intermediate-level course studies the literature of a specific topic or movement. Emphasis is placed on the importance and relevance of the topic or movement within historical and literary trends. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.

EN236 - Young Adult Literature

This course provides a survey of Young Adult Literature, examining diverse genres such as science fiction, fantasy, historical fiction, and romance. Students will learn about YA's history, controversies, and influence. Among the questions we will ask: how does YA construct young adulthood; what is YA; what are the characteristics of YA; what makes YA so popular? Students will be asked to: 1) study literature within its historical, social, and cultural contexts; 2) apply techniques of literary analysis to literature; 4) identify and discuss selected characteristics of literature; 5) develop close reading, critical thinking, and writing skills

EN238 - Comics and Graphic Novels

This course will introduce students to the comics medium through a variety of genres. Through reading, researching, and responding to graphic narratives, students will develop a critical vocabulary for understanding graphic narratives and explore the intersections between literary genres and narrative form.

EN260 - Special Problems

This is an independent study or research on a subject of interest to an individual student. Course may be taken for 1-5 credit hours

EN268 - Internship and Field Experiences

May be taken for 1-5 credit hours

EN290 - Special Topics

This is an intermediate-level course on a topic not included in the regular curriculum. Course may be taken for 1-5 credit hours

EN305 - Expository Writing

This course focuses on the development of expository texts in various genres. This advanced course in composition is designed to relate to the specific needs and interests of upper-level students. Either EN305 or EN306 is required of all students.

EN306 - Technical Writing

This advanced course is designed to relate to the specific needs of upper-level students in technical fields with an emphasis on work-related forms. Technical writing is a mode of information management designed either to prompt action (persuasive documents such as proposals) or to enable action (instructions and informative reports). EN306 introduces students to different forms of technical writing (and not necessarily business writing) and to critical thinking and communication skills. Students will write memos and business letters as well as lengthy, detailed, and researched documents, proposals, and reports. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to analyze the purpose for and audience for documents produced in technical fields and will be able to manage information in order to produce, clear, effective technical documents. Either EN305 or EN306 is required of all students

EN312 - English Language and Linguistics

This course will introduce students to the field of linguistic study. Topics will include the history of the English language, English dialects, theories of grammar, language development, and how linguistics can help teachers in the classroom. Students are encouraged to take EN211 Grammar for Educators before taking this course.

EN323 - American Literature I

This is a study of American poetry, prose, and drama from Colonial America to 1865

EN324 - American Literature II

This is a study of the American poetry, prose, and drama from 1865 to present.

EN334 - Majors Authors in Literature

This intermediate-level course studies the literature associated with a specific author or authors. Emphasis is placed on the importance and relevance of the author(s) within historical and literary trends. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.

EN335 - Shakespeare

This is a study of William Shakespeare's major histories, tragedies, and comedies

EN340 - British Literature I

This is a study of British poetry, prose, and drama up to 1790.

EN342 - British Literature II

This is a study of the poetry, prose, and drama from 1790 to present.

EN348 - Advanced Literary Studies

This upper-level course studies a specific author or authors, topic, or movement in literary studies, and the literature associated with the author(s), topic, or movement. Emphasis is placed on the importance and relevance of the author(s), topic, or movement within historical and literary trends. May be repeated for credit as topics change

EN350 - Topics in Writing

This course focuses on the composition and development of a variety of texts relevant to the special topic. This advanced course in composition is designed to relate to the specific needs and interests of upper-level students. Fulfills the advanced writing requirement for general education. EN305, EN306 or EN350 is required of all students. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.

EN360 - Special Problems

This is an independent study or research on a subject of interest to an individual student. Course may be taken for 1-5 credit hours.

EN368 - Internship and Field Experiences

course may be taken for 1-5 credit hours

EN390 - Special Topics

This is an advanced course on a topic not included in the regular curriculum

EN409 - Writing Research and Pedagogy

This course surveys composition theory with an emphasis on practical application for teachers and tutors of writing.

EN410 - Senior Thesis

(Capstone) Students will complete a semester long capstone experience that includes a portfolio and project that are the culmination of student work and experience in the major. Students that are majoring in English

EN460 - Special Problems

This is an independent study or research on a subject of interest to an individual student. Course may be taken for 1-5 credit hours.

EN490 - Special Topics

This is an advanced course on a topic not included in the regular curriculum.

EN509 Theory and Practice of Teaching Composition

This course covers theories and practices of teaching composition.  Students will engage the historical trajectory of composition scholarship and analyze ongoing debates about writing instruction.  Students will engage in weekly discussions about composition pedagogy and design semester-long research projects that engage current composition theories and practices. Meets MEd Standard 2.

EN535 Shakespeare

This course is an advanced study of selected Shakespearean plays and the Elizabethan era/world in which Shakespeare lived and worked. We will consider Shakespeare as a professional dramatist in the Early Modern English theatre along with some of the literary questions raised with regard to Shakespeare’s life and works. There is an emphasis on the context and critical reaction to those works through the lens of contemporary literary theory which will allow us consider Shakespeare’s plays both as products of their author's time and as contemporary cultural works. Meets MEd Standard 1.

ET275 Enactus

Students will participate in the Enactus program in developing and implementing programs to inform the community about the free enterprise system. May be repeated.

ET375 Small Business Management

Characteristics of the entrepreneur, methods of starting and running a self-owned business, and an awareness of the legal, financial, marketing, and personnel problems of the entrepreneur.

ET475 Entrepreneurship

This course will focus on the identification, development, and growth of the entrepreneur and the firm within the free enterprise system. Students will explore small business in terms of risk, difficulties, achievement, orientation, rewards, and satisfaction. Operating problems within selected business opportunities at varying stages of growth and development will be discussed. Students will have the opportunity to interact with entrepreneurs in the classroom and in the actual work environment.

EX203 Introduction to Exercise Science

This course offers instruction and practice through teaching strategies and participation to demonstrate developmentally appropriate strength and conditioning principles to both K-12 students and collegiate athletes in muscular strength, endurance, power, flexibility, and conditioning. The course focuses on kinesiology and the biomechanic principles used in training athletes and clients for the primary goal of improving athletic performance and fitness.

EX331 Advanced Exercise Science

The study of the scientific principles, concepts, and theories of strength training and conditioning and their applications to athletic performance designed to prepare students to teach and supervise strength and conditioning programs in athletics and recreation.

FB101 Personal Finance

This course is a survey course for both business and non-business students in personal financial planning including personal budgeting, investments, insurance, credit, housing, and retirement planning. Fundamentals of financial planning and making educated decisions regarding spending, saving, borrowing and investing that lead to long-term financial security are the key components of the course.

FB345 Investment Analysis

Study of the valuation of various investment securities, including corporate bonds, preferred and common stocks, stock options, warrants, and rights. A section on personal money management will be included.

FB351 Business Finance

Study of the concepts and techniques involved in providing funds for a business organization. Topics include the evaluation of decisions involving the acquisition of assets (capital budgeting), working capital management, financial ratio analysis, sources of funds and the cost of capital.

GD202 Concepts of Graphic Design

Introduction to contemporary typography and design. This class explores the principles of applied design as used in the production of brochures, catalogs, magazines, newspapers, etc. Topics will include the use of type, layout, and the use of visual elements using graphics software for project presentation. Basic concepts, principles and elements of design are reinforced through creative problem solving. Students will begin portfolio development.

GD302 Applied Graphic Design

Project oriented class for the application of design theory, procedures and processes while creating, acquiring and editing images in digital format. Course subjects will include: learning and using creative design software programs, advertising design for publication, image resolution and color processes. Students will continue to refine their portfolios.

GD312 Studies in Advanced Graphic Design

This course is an in-depth study and practice in graphic design and how art and business are integrated. Students will be expected to produce design solutions that reflect edited conceptual development, advanced strategic thinking and professional product appearance. This course consolidates previous graphic design knowledge and skills. Students will finalize their graphic design portfolios with a culminating project.

GL105 Exploring Geology

This course introduces students to the science of geology. Topics include the study of the origin of the earth, plate tectonics, volcanoes, weathering, metamorphism, geologic time, evolution, and the history of life on earth. MOTR GEOL 100 Geology Core 42 Website

GL105L Exploring Geology Lab

Labs explore minerals, rocks, fossils, and the living organisms characteristic of different geologic ages. MOTR GEOL 100L Geology Core 42 Website

GR101 Elementary German I

Beginning course. This is an introduction to current German, including oral practice, listening and reading comprehension, and the grammar necessary for spoken and written expression. There is also an introduction to German culture. No prior German required.

GR102 Intermediate German

This is a continuation of GR101 to current German, including oral practice, listening and reading comprehension, and the grammar necessary for spoken and written expression. There is also an introduction to German culture.

HI101 - World History I

A survey from early Mesopotamian and Egyptian civilizations to the 17th century. Topics include: Classical Greece and Rome; Judaism, Christianity and Islam; the feudal age in Europe, Asia and Africa; the commercial revolution; the Renaissance; and the Protestant Revolt. MOTR HIST 201 World History I Core 42 Website

HI102 - World History II

A survey from the 17th century (century of genius) to the present. Topics include: the liberal revolutions in England, America and France; the impact of science and Social Darwinism; the industrial revolution; democratization; World Wars I - II; the communist revolutions in Russia and China; the post-colonial Third World; and modern thought and expression. MOTR HIST 202 World History II Core 42 Website

HI103 - Introduction to Missouri Civics

An introduction to the Missouri Constitution, state political institutions, and processes. This course will fulfill the Missouri State Civics requirement for transfer students who have completed coursework from a non-Missouri institution in American Government or a survey of American History I or an equivalent course which covers the U.S. Constitution. Online only. Cross-listed with PS103.

HI117 - Development of the United States

A survey from settlement to the end of Reconstruction (1877). Topics include: basic institutions (family, religion, education, politics and economics); the causes of the American Revolution; democratization; the U.S. Constitution; development of political parties; the causes of the Civil War; and the changing status of African-Americans. Fulfills the state civics requirement.

HI118 - Development of the United States II

A survey from Reconstruction to the present. Topics include: basic institutions (family, religion, education, politics, and economics); the transition from an isolationistic regional power to an inter-nationalistic world power; the decline of laissez-faire; democratization; recent constitutional interpretation; and the changing status of African-Americans. Fulfills the state civics requirement.

HI190 - Special Topics

Introductory course on a topic not included in the regular curriculum. May be taken for 1-5 credit hours.

HI204 - World Cultures

A survey of western and non-western world cultures using anthropological and historical perspectives. Special emphasis on sample groups in Africa, India and Asia. Cross-listed with SO204.

HI205 - World Geography

An examination of major traditions: physical geography, historical-cultural geography and location geography.

HI306 - The Civil War and Reconstruction

A study of the forces and events that transformed nineteenth-century America in the period between 1840 and 1870. The course examines the conduct and impact of the war and its political, economic and social aftermath.

HI307 - The History and Politics of Missouri

A survey of the social, economic, intellectual, and political history of Missouri from prehistory to the twentieth century. Fulfills the state civics requirement. Cross-listed with PS307.

HI320 - The American Way of War

A survey of the American military during peace and war from Colonial times to the present. Major American and world political leaders and their top military commanders are examined in their social and historical contexts. Cross-listed with PS320.

HI322 - Comparative Political Systems

An introduction to the comparative study of national political systems. Attention is focused on the role of political culture and historical evolution as determinants of political development. Cross-listed with PS322.

HI340 - Teaching with Historic Places

A multi-dimensional study of historic places for use in the social studies classroom to understand history, historical change, and cultural continuity. Cross-listed with SO340.

HI354 - The Vietnam War- an International History

Vietnam was America's longest war. This class examines that war and all of its ramifications. Covering the early history of Vietnam, to the years after the Vietnam War, the class places America's Southeast Asian conflict within a larger global framework.

HS110 - Concepts in Health Care Management

 In this introductory course, students will learn the key elements of health care management.  Topics covered will include career opportunities, leadership, management and motivation, organizational behavior, strategic planning, healthcare marketing, quality of c are, basic financial challenges, ethics and legal issues. 

HS110 Concepts in Health Care Management

In this introductory course, students will learn the key elements of health care management.  Topics covered will include career opportunities, leadership, management and motivation, organizational behavior, strategic planning, healthcare marketing, quality of care, basic financial challenges, ethics and legal issues.   

HS300 Professional Practice in Healthcare

This course will introduce students to the role of the baccalaureate prepared health professional. Students will transition from clinicians to professionals, and acquire a deeper understanding of their professional role.

HS304 - Health Care Law

 This course provides a summary of the current legislation governing the provision of health care services, the accountability and responsibilities of health care providers, and the rights of individuals receiving services. Includes, but is not limited to: HIPAA, standards of care, professional Codes of Ethics, Practice Acts, Informed Consent, and the concepts of beneficence, social justice, non-maleficence, altruism, autonomy, human dignity, and integrity in the provision of health care services.

HS304 Health Care Law

This course provides a summary of the current legislation governing the provision of health care services, the accountability and responsibilities of health care providers, and the rights of individuals receiving services. Includes, but is not limited to: HIPAA, standards of care, professional Codes of Ethics, Practice Acts, Informed Consent, and the concepts of beneficence, social justice, non-maleficence, altruism, autonomy, human dignity, and integrity in the provision of health care services.

HS314 - Insurance - Coding - Billing in Health Care

The course introduces the student to the current foundations of reimbursement for health care services by third party payers. Typical requirements for documentation and reporting for insurance purposes are explored, including the usual insurance requirement for pre-certification or prior authorization for services. Standards for accuracy in coding, and how these interface with the billing function are surveyed. 

HS314 Insurance, Coding, and Billing in Health Care

The course introduces the student to the current foundations of reimbursement for health care services by third party payers. Typical requirements for documentation and reporting for insurance purposes are explored, including the usual insurance requirement for pre-certification or prior authorization for services. Standards for accuracy in coding, and how these interface with the billing function are surveyed.

HS400 - Health Care Informatics

 The student is introduced to the current basic requirements for the recording and appropriate sharing of health information through mostly electronic systems. Included are aspects of the evolving Electronic Medical Record.  

HS400 Health Care Informatics

The student is introduced to the current basic requirements for the recording and appropriate sharing of health information through mostly electronic systems. Included are aspects of the evolving Electronic Medical Record. Cross listed as AH400.

HS410 -Client Education and Health Care

The provision of hands-on care is only one aspect of appropriate health care services. Professional providers of health care services are also responsible for providing clients and families accurate and adequate education about their health issues. This course explores the various individual assessments necessary to determine a client's learning readiness and how to develop and adapt appropriate information to a format that meets the needs of the individual client.  

HS410 Client Education and Health Care

The provision of hands-on care is only one aspect of appropriate health care services. Professional providers of health care services are also responsible for providing clients and families accurate and adequate education about their health issues. This course explores the various individual assessments necessary to determine a client's learning readiness and how to develop and adapt appropriate information to a format that meets the needs of the individual client.

HS420 - Case Studies in Managerial Integrity

This course emphasizes managerial integrity and responsibility, creative and critical problem-solving skills with consideration to a global perspective, all of which are essential for personal and professional success in today's rapidly changing business and healthcare environment. Course work will include case analysis and presentation. 

HS420 Case Studies in Managerial Integrity

This course emphasizes managerial integrity and responsibility, creative and critical problem-solving skills with consideration to a global perspective, all of which are essential for personal and professional success in today's rapidly changing business and healthcare environment. Course work will include case analysis and presentation.

HS430 - Current Issues in Professional Pracctice

The student researches current professional literature on each of the core topic areas of the Health Sciences degree. Weekly, each student provides a formal discussion of the assigned core topic area as it pertains to their practicum experience that is supported by current professional literature. Students respond to peers weekly in constructive dialogue, and utilize current professional literature to support their peer responses. APA format is required for discussions and responses. The final project at the end of the course provides the student with the opportunity to summarize what has been learned in the course.  

HS430 Current Issues in Professional Practice

The student researches current professional literature on each of the core topic areas of the Health Sciences degree. Weekly, each student provides a formal discussion of the assigned core topic area as it pertains to their practicum experience that is supported by current professional literature. Students respond to peers weekly in constructive dialogue, and utilize current professional literature to support their peer responses. APA format is required for discussions and responses. The final project at the end of the course provides the student with the opportunity to summarize what has been learned in the course.

HS440 Business Management Practicum

The student spends a minimum of 6 weeks full time (240 contact hours), longer than 6 weeks if part time, shadowing a mentor in a health care provider/business setting. Each week requires the student to observe and assess a different aspect of the work environment, based on the core topics of the Health Sciences degree. Students provide weekly summaries of these assessments and identification of observed opportunities for improvement. Special attention is paid to the observed leadership, conflict management, communication, employee management, and customer service/satisfaction styles exhibited in the practice setting. Each student develops a final Power Point presentation of their practicum experience. Included in the final PowerPoint presentation is a detailed recommendation developed to address a specific opportunity for improvement identified within the practicum setting.

IB376 International Business

Introduction and overview of international business as it has evolved to the present time. Coverage includes the evolution of international business structure, processes utilized by international and multi-national businesses, and the effect of national policy on international business. Particular attention will be devoted to evaluating how culture, language, political and legal issues impact management policy and decision making. The course also explores the role of mid-size firms in the international market.

IS105 Living in a Digital World

This course will introduce key areas students need to develop in order to be ethical and informed digital citizens in an increasingly technology rich world. The course will include material concerning related social, ethical, environmental, and legal issues surrounding technology. It will also provide a grounding in digital and civic literacy.

IT500 Transforming Learning with Technology

This course is designed to enhance and extend the technology skills of practicing individuals, apply those skills in innovative ways, and create an environment that supports collaborate, project-based learning. Participants will study basic and advanced features of software (operating system, word processing, spreadsheets, presentation software, internet, concept mapping) and hardware (interactive white boards, projectors, wireless technology, cameras) and  integrating technology.

IT505 Ethics and Issues in Educational Technology

This course will introduce students to contemporary educational issues in local, state, national, and international contexts. Students will review and discuss literature related to topics such as information literacy, ethics, gaming, interactive web applications, teacher leadership, past and current legislation, professional development, and standards-based education.

IT510 Technology in the Special Education Classroom

In developing new technology, software and hardware companies have not overlooked the spectrum of special needs and special education students. Technology in special education classrooms is an industry within an industry and it is constantly developing and improving product for special needs. Students will explore current technology such as: using a computer without a monitor for the blind, braille displays, word prediction software, tables, and more. Meets standard III.

IT515 Technology and its Impact on Coaching

In the world of sports, technology has impacted almost every aspect of playing, watching, and coaching. Students will review and discuss technology in regards to training and performance (wearable technology), communication and management, and video and analysis (record, view, and replay performances).

MA090 - Computer-Assisted Pre-algebra

This course is designed for students who lack the necessary arithmetic and/or algebraic skills to undertake courses in mathematics and science. This course emphasizes individualized instruction and computer-assisted learning. Concepts are divided into modules which students must master to progress in the course. Students who complete all the required modules have met the prerequisite for MA103 College Algebra (Intensive) 5 hr. course. Students are placed into the class based on University policy or by permission of the Chair. Course hours will not count toward graduation.

MA103 - College Algebra

A study of equations and inequalities, functions and graphs, and systems of equations and inequalities. MOTR MATH 130 Pre-Calculus Algebra Core 42 Website

MA103I - College Algebra - intensive

A study of equations and inequalities, functions and graphs, and systems of equations and inequalities. This course is designed to allow students to study algebra at a slower pace. MOTR MATH 130 Pre-Calculus Algebra Core 42 Website

MA104 - Analytic Geometry and Trigonometry

Theory and application of the trigonometric functions. Primarily for students preparing for calculus or physics.

MA105 - Elementary Statistics

An introduction to basic statistical procedures and inference, with emphasis on applications and statistical reasoning. Topics include data collection and presentation, descriptive statistics, probability, probability distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation and regression. MOTR MATH 110 Statistical Reasoning Core 42 Website

MA106 Probabilities and Statistics

Methods for visual presentation of data, measures of central tendency, measures of variation, introduction to probability, counting methods and advanced probability, normal distribution, binomial distribution, inferential statistics and hypothesis testing, regression and correlation, and Chi-Square and F distributions.

MA108 Finite Mathematics

Finite Mathematics is designed to introduce students to concepts of mathematics that are relevant to business and social science applications. This includes topics such as systems and equations related to matrices, linear inequalities and linear programming, basic set theory, probability, measure of central tendency and dispersion, and counting techniques, permutation, and combinations.

MA109 - Quantitative Reasoning

An introduction to important mathematical ideas and their impact on society, with a focus on problem solving skills that can be applied to all fields. Topics include proportional reasoning, modeling, and probability; may also include sets and Venn Diagrams, logic, finance, voting systems, graph theory, game theory, and linear programming. MOTR MATH 120 Mathematical Reasoning & Modeling Core 42 Website

MA109I - Quantitative Reasoning - intensive

This course provides additional support and supplemental instruction for students who have met the prerequisites below. An introduction to important mathematical ideas and their impact on society, with a focus on problem solving skills that can be applied to all fields. Topics include proportional reasoning, modeling, and probability; may also include sets and Venn Diagrams, logic, finance, voting systems, graph theory, game theory, and linear programming. MOTR MATH 120 Mathematical Reasoning & Modeling Core 42 Website

MA112 - Selected Topics in Calculus

An introduction to the basic concepts of calculus with business and social science applications

MA118 Calculus and Analytical Geometry

The differentiation and integration of algebraic functions and transcendental functions of a single variable, and an introduction to analytic geometry.

MA202 - Elements in Geometry

This course covers the general topics of Euclidean geometry. Students will become familiar with geometry terminology, principles and proofs. Emphasis is on deductive reasoning and problem solving, particularly in geometric based applications. This course is recommended for all students majoring in BSE, Middle School Certification with a Concentration in Mathematics. This class does not meet the geometry requirement for mathematics majors.

MA207 - Discrete Mathematics

Introduction to discrete mathematics topics including counting methods, graph theory, recursion, number theory, and writing proofs using direct and indirect reasoning and induction.

MA209 Calculus and Analytic Geometry II

Applications of integration; the differentiation and integration of transcendental functions, and topics in analytic geometry.

MA224 Mathematics for Elementary and Middle Grade Teachers

Mathematics central to a comprehensive elementary and middle school mathematics curriculum in a problem solving context. Includes the development of the real numbers as a mathematical system and an informal introduction to geometric concepts. Only Early Childhood majors may count this course for the General Education Common Core

MA303 - History of Mathematics

A study of the history of mathematics.

MA305 - Statistics II

This is a continuation of the study of statistics that began in MA105. Topics include but are not limited to experimental design, non-parametric techniques, regression analysis, and ANOVA

MA308 - Calculus and Analytic Geometry III

The calculus of several variables, solid analytic geometry, and series

MA315 - Differential Equations

The study of ordinary differential equations using operational, transform and/or series methods, with selected applications

MA317 - Modern Algebra

Topics from number theory, groups, rings, integral domains and fields.

MA318 - Matrices and Linear Algebra

Introduction to matrix algebra and vector fields, with applications.

MA319 - College Geometry

The rigorous development of geometry from foundational axioms, with consideration of absolute, Euclidean, and some non-Euclidean geometry

MA321 - Introduction to Real Analysis

Students will study the real number system, limits, sequences, series, and convergence; completeness; limits and continuity; and selected topics from differentiation and integration theory.

MA322 - Computers in the Mathematics Classroom

This course is designed to prepare mathematics educators to write mathematical documents that are of publishable quality. Students will also be instructed in the use of current mathematical software that includes, but may not be limited to, Geogebra and Desmos

MA360 - Special Problems

This course can be for 1-5 hours

MA480 - Senior Projects

A course tailored to the individual student's needs. Special projects will be designed to extend each student's area of interest.

MA504 - Writing Mathematical Documents Including LaTex

This course concerns creating mathematical documents. Students will learn to read and write in the language of mathematics, including all the symbols and notations commonly found in the field of mathematics, by creating original documents and interpreting and replicating existing documents. Students will be introduced to the use of LaTex.

MA504 Writing Mathematical Documents

This course concerns creating mathematical documents. Students will learn to read and write in the language of mathematics, including all the symbols and notations commonly found in the field of mathematics, by creating original documents and interpreting replicating existing documents. Meets MEd Standard 1.

MA509 - Proof in Mathematics

A complete survey of mathematical proofs, covering all major techniques and styles. Introduction of entirely new areas of mathematics is limited as far as possible, in favor of a focus on the process of thinking about and composing proofs in more familiar contexts. 

MA509 Proof in Mathematics

A complete survey of mathematical proofs, covering all major techniques and styles. Introduction of entirely new areas of mathematics is limited as far as possible, in favor of a focus on the process of thinking about and composing proofs in more familiar contexts. Meets MEd Standard 1.

MA519 - Matrices and Linear Algebra

An introduction to matrix algebra and vector fields, with application

MA519 Matrices and Linear Algebra

An introduction to matrix algebra and vector fields, with applications. Meets MEd Standard 1.

MA525 - Introduction to Real Analysis

Students will study the real number system, limits, sequences, series, and convergence; completeness; limits and continuity; and selected topics from differentiation and integration theory.

MA525 Introduction to Real Analysis

Students will study the real number system, limits, sequences, series, and convergence; completeness; limits and continuity; and selected topics from differentiation and integration theory. Meets MEd Standard 1.

MA528 Advanced Statistics

This course addresses the topics of correlation and regression, particularly modeling phenomena using appropriate data. Non-parametric techniques are developed and applied, as well as one-way and two-way ANOVA procedures. Prerequisite: Students enrolling in this course should have completed an elementary statistics course that included hypothesis testing (MA105 or its equivalent). Meets MEd Standard 1.

MA529 - Mathematical Statistics

Topics in statistics, including combinatorial methods, probability, sampling distributions, and hypothesis testing are presented and proven with the detailed application of advanced calculus.

MA529 Mathematical Statistics

Topics in statistics, including combinatorial methods, probability, sampling distributions, and hypothesis testing are presented and proven with the detailed application of advanced calculus. Meets MEd Standard 1.

MA532 - Number Theory

Divisibility, prime numbers, congruences, quadratic reciprocity, cryptography, introduction to Sage for number theoretic computations, Diophantine equations. 3 hours.

MA534 - Modern Algebra

 Topics include number theory, groups, rings, integral domains and fields.

MA534 Modern Algebra

Topics include number theory, groups, rings, integral domains and fields. Meets MEd Standard 1.

MA538 - Complex Analysis

 An introduction to the study of functions of a complex variable including the algebra and geometry of complex numbers, derivatives, analytic functions, integral theorems, and applications.

MA538 Complex Analysis

An introduction to the study of functions of a complex variable including the algebra and geometry of complex numbers, derivatives, analytic functions, integral theorems, and applications. Meets MEd Standard 1.

MA545 - Numerical Analysis

The understanding and application of computer-based methods for solving equations and systems of equations; approximating functions, derivatives, and integrals; solving differential equations; and optimization. Computer programming is essential to the course, but no previous experience is assumed.

MA545 Numerical Analysis

The understanding and application of computer-based methods for solving equations and systems of equations; approximating functions, derivatives, and integrals; solving differential equations; and optimization. Computer programming is essential to the course, but no previous experience is assumed. Meets MEd Standard 1.

MA550 - History of Mathematics

Development of mathematics through calculus; solutions of problems with historical significance; problems the highlight significant mathematical characteristics.

MA550 History of Mathematics

Development of mathematics through calculus; solutions of problems with historical significance; problems the highlight significant mathematical characteristics. Meets MEd Standard 1.

MA555 - Topology

Including sets, relations, functions, metric spaces, compactness, completeness and connectedness. 

MA555 Topology

Including sets, relations, functions, metric spaces, compactness, completeness and connectedness.

MG354 Principles of Management

Knowledge, roles, responsibilities, and skills required of modern managers with emphasis on bureaucracy, decision-making authority, social responsibility, specialization, leadership, and problem solving.

MG356 Human Resource Management

HRM concepts related to the selection of employees, employee training, leadership styles, job design, communication systems, and rewards and punishments.

MG370 Information Systems

Survey of the systems development process and the role of information systems in business with emphasis on accounting information systems. Students will become familiar with the general role, structure, and control of the accounting information system. A specific application software package for a small business is introduced and used. Cross-listed with AC370.

MG477 Production and Operations Management

Knowledge, roles, responsibilities, and skills required of modern operations managers. An emphasis is placed on production planning, scheduling, forecasting, and programming.

MK235 Consumer Behavior

Consumer behavior is the study of when, why, how, and where people do or do not buy products. It blends elements from psychology, sociology, social anthropology, and economics. It attempts to understand the buyer decision-making process, both individually and in groups. It studies characteristics of individual consumers such as demographics and behavioral variables in an attempt to understand people's wants. It also tries to assess influences on the consumer from groups such as family, friends, reference groups, and society in general. The course also looks at misbehavior by both consumers and firms as well as the ethics of marketing.

MK303 Sports Marketing and Events

This course provides a framework for understanding the management and marketing strategies used within the sports management and marketing industries today. This course is intended to cover three basic components: sports as a medium, sports as a product and the emerging considerations relevant for the application of marketing techniques, tasks and event planning responsibilities that can be applied in amateur, recreational or professional sports, sporting events and entertainment events. Cross-listed with SPM303.

MK330 Marketing

Concepts and techniques involved in marketing products and services to consumers and industrial users. Topics include the role of marketing, the selection of marketing targets, product planning, channels of distribution, product promotion and pricing.

MK339 Sales Management

Effective tools and techniques employed by salespeople and field sales managers including psychology of selling, use of research, personal time management, and the motivation and evaluation of salespeople. It includes student role-playing of selling situations.

MK366 Advertising

Hands-on approach to the advertising campaign and stresses the utilization of marketing research for the development of creative concepts and strategy. Emphasis is placed on problem-solving and the production of copy and visuals as well as the refinement of presentation skills. This is a project-intensive course.

MK378 Marketing Research

Study of marketing research theory and practice and their real world application to small and large businesses. Includes case studies of contemporary ideas in marketing research and their execution. Emphasis on hands-on work with reviews and suggested revision of marketing plans of local businesses.

MK430 Strategic Marketing

An in-depth analysis of the quantitative and qualitative factors involved in the management of the marketing function and adapting to the new economy. An overall emphasis on customer relationship management, technology and the internet, brand building, and global marketing. Value based marketing and managing profits, performance and accountability of a business are also emphasized. Students will develop a sample marketing plan for review by a marketing professional.

ML100 - Lower Level Private Study

May be taken for 1-3 credit hours.

ML300 - Upper Level Private Study

May be taken for 1-4 credit hours.

MU010 - Recital Attendance

Zero credit. All applied music students are required to enroll concurrently for Recital Attendance and attend the required number of recitals during the semester.

MU021 - Marching Eagles Band

Practices daily during football season. Presents half-time shows at home games, hosts Band Day (a high school marching competition), and is open by audition to all qualified students. Students may elect to enroll in Marching Band for physical education credit. Cross-listed with PE100. May be taken for 0, .5, or one credit hour.

MU022 - Concert Band

A band open by audition to qualified students. Selected students play on-campus concerts and go on an annual tour. May be taken for 0, .5, or one credit hour.

MU024 - University Band

A band open to all instrumental musicians in the CMU community. The band will perform on-campus concerts during the spring semester. May be taken for 0, .5, or one credit hour.

MU041 - Chorale

A select concert choir open by audition to all qualified students. Rehearses three hours per week. Performs on-campus concerts, goes on an annual tour, performs oratorios, and sings at church services. May be taken for 0, .5, or one credit hour.

MU045 - Conservatory Singers

The Conservatory Singers is a mixed choir that has the responsibility of sharing in the worship services in Linn Memorial United Methodist Church and performs on-campus concerts. May be taken for 0, .5, or one credit hour.

MU051 - Instrumental Jazz Ensemble

Open to qualified students by audition with the consent of the Director of Bands. Plays concerts on and off campus. May be taken for 0, .5, or one credit hour.

MU060 - Opera Workshop

Open to qualified students by consent of the sponsoring instructor and the Dean of the Conservatory. Offered on demand. May be taken for 0, .5, or one credit hour.

MU061 - Brass Ensemble

Open to qualified students by consent of the sponsoring instructor and the Dean of the Conservatory. Offered on demand. May be taken for 0, .5, or one credit hour.

MU063 - Womens Vocal Ensemble

Open to qualified students by consent of the sponsoring instructor and the Dean of the Conservatory. Offered on demand. May be taken for 0, .5, or one credit hour.

MU064 - Woodwind Ensemble

Open to qualified students by consent of the sponsoring instructor and the Dean of the Conservatory. Offered on demand. May be taken for 0, .5, or one credit hour.

MU065 - Mens Vocal Ensemble

Open to qualified students by consent of the sponsoring instructor and the Dean of the Conservatory. Offered on demand. May be taken for 0, .5, or one credit hour.

MU066 - Jazz Combo

Open to qualified students by consent of the sponsoring instructor and the Dean of the Conservatory. Offered on demand. May be taken for 0, .5, or one credit hour.

MU067 -Chapel Voice

Open to qualified students by consent of the sponsoring instructor and the Dean of the Conservatory. Offered on demand. May be taken for 0, .5, or one credit hour.

MU068 - Chapel Band

Open to qualified students by consent of the sponsoring instructor and the Dean of the Conservatory. Offered on demand. May be taken for 0, .5, or one credit hour.

MU071 - Accompanying

Available to piano students who rehearse in an accompanying capacity for two hours per week. May be taken for 0, .5, or one credit hour.

MU104 - Orientation for Music Transfers

An orientation class designed to assist music department transfer students as they adapt to university life, to discuss resources and skills necessary for success at the university level, and to prepare a degree plan.

MU105 - Fundamentals of Music Technology

A study of electronic instruments, staged sound, staged lighting, projection, recording technology, acoustics, notation and organizational software, and other technology as related to the music field. Many assignments will be completed with the use of notation and sequencing software.

MU107 - The Theory and Practice of Music I

The fundamentals of music, integrating basic materials and skills. A study of triads, modes, scales, and harmonic progressions, as well as well as analysis of melody and melodic organization.

MU108 - The Theory and Practice of Music II

A continuation of Music 107, including seventh chords, modulation, secondary chords and the study of simple musical forms.

MU109 - Music Business

A Survey of business, marketing, entrepreneurial, and budget-related skills as pertinent to the field of music.

MU117 - Aural Skills I

3 contact hours. A study in singing, playing, and dictation of the same materials studied in MU107 and study of the melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic structures of non-Western cultures.

MU118 - Aural Skills II

2 contact hours. A continuation of MU117.

MU122 - String Techniques

2 contact hours. Emphasis is on procedures for the instruction of the stringed instruments in the public schools. 

MU124 - Percussion Techniques

2 contact hours. Emphasis on procedures for the instruction of percussion instruments of the band and orchestra in the public schools

MU127 - Trumpet Class

 Emphasis is on procedures for teaching trumpet to beginning through high school students.

MU128 - Clarinet Class

Emphasis is on procedures for teaching clarinet to beginning through high school students.

MU129 - Guitar Techniques

 Emphasis is on preparing students to use the guitar as an instrument for accompanying simple songs in the elementary school classroom. 

MU131 - Keyboard Techniques I

2 contact hours. Group instruction in the fundamental principles of piano technique and keyboard harmony. 

MU132 - Keyboard Techniques II

 2 contact hours. Group instruction in the fundamental principles of piano technique and keyboard harmony. 

MU141 - Learning to Sing

 A study of the fundamentals of singing and accompanying: vocal production and public presentation. Literature will include art song, Broadway songs and hymns.

MU143 - Learning to Sing II

A continuation of MU141 Learning to Sing. A study of the fundamentals of singing, vocal production, and public presentation. Literature will include art songs, Broadway songs, and hymns.

MU145 - History of Jazz

Introduction and survey of the cultural and musical significance of Jazz in America, its development, and roots in Africa, the West Indies and Europe. Fulfills "Fine Arts" requirement.

MU146 - Group Voice Class

 In this course, singers will develop healthy vocal technique and expressive interpretation skills necessary for choral singing.

MU150 - Introduction to Western Music

A common experience course designed to introduce the art music of Western European and American culture. The course consists of three major components: 1) Exploration of representative masterworks of music literature through score study and guided listening; 2) Basics of musical notation and theory including aural skills and sight singing; and 3) introduction of computers and relevant software as tools for the professional musician. MU150 is first course in the theory, and history and literature sequences for the Music major and minor.

MU160 - Special Problems

Independent study or research on a subject of interest to an individual student. May be taken for 1-3 credit hours.

MU188 - Music Appreciation - the World of Music

Designed to serve the cultural interests of students not concentrating in music. Lectures and assigned readings are supplemented by recorded music. No credit toward a major in Music. Fulfills "Fine Arts" requirement. MOTR MUSC 100 Music Appreciation Core 42 Website

MU190 - Special Topics

Introductory course on a topic not included in the regular curriculum. May be taken for 1-5 credit hours.

MU202 - Musical Theater and Opera on DVD-Video

An introductory survey course covering musical theatre and opera. Students will watch performances and develop an understanding of style, drama, characters, orchestration, and the cultural influences of both genres. This course fulfills the Fine Arts requirement.

MU203 - Advanced Music Technology

A continuation of Fundamentals of Music Technology, this class surveys advanced technological techniques. A focus on church- and school-related components. Many assignments will be completed with the use of notation and sequencing software.

MU204 - Worship Design

A focus on designing a worship service. This class takes into account all aspects of designing a service including artistic and practical issues in various worship traditions (liturgical, free church, emergent, traditional, blended, etc.) and musical styles.

MU207 - The Theory and Practice of Music III

A continuation of MU 108, including chromatic harmony, the study of larger musical forms and the analysis of musical style.

MU214 - Basic Conducting

 An introduction to techniques of conducting with and without a baton. Emphasis is on mastery of basic skills and a repertoire of gestures designed to elicit specific responses from an ensemble. 

MU217 - Aural Skills III

2 contact hours. A study in singing, playing and dictation of materials studied in MU207. 

MU223 - Woodwind Techniques

2 contact hours. Emphasis is on procedures for the instruction of the woodwind instruments of the band and orchestra in the public schools.

MU225 - Brass Techniques

2 contact hours. Emphasis is on procedures for the instruction of the brass instruments of the band and orchestra in the public schools. 

MU231 - Keyboard Techniques III

Group instruction in the fundamental principles of piano technique and keyboard harmony.

MU232 - Keyboard Techniques IV

Group instruction in the fundamental principles of piano technique and keyboard harmony.

MU241 - Diction for Singers

Focuses on English, Italian, French, and German diction, speaking, and singing with the use of the International Phonetic Alphabet.   

MU260 - Special Problems

Independent study or research on a subject of interest to an individual student. May be taken for 1-5 credit hours.

MU268 - Internship and Field Experiences

1-5 hours each semester

MU290 - Special Topics

Intermediate-level course on a topic not included in the regular curriculum. May be taken for 1-5 credit hours.

MU301 - Marching Band

Available to students who have completed four semesters in band. May be taken for 0, .5, or one credit hour.

MU302 - Concert Band

Available to students who have completed four semesters in band. May be taken for 0, .5, or one credit hour.

MU303 - Chorale

Available to students who have completed four semesters in Choir. May be taken for 0,.5, or one credit hour.

MU304 - Conservatory Singers

Available to students who have completed four semesters in Choir. May be taken for 0, .5, or one credit hour.

MU305 - Jazz Ensemble

Available to students who have completed four semesters in Instrumental Jazz Ensemble. May be taken for 0, .5, or one credit hour.

MU310 - Commercial - Jazz Music Theory

The fundamentals of commercial and jazz music, integrating basic materials and skills.  A study of extended harmonies, modes, scales, and harmonic progressions relevant to the style.  An analysis of the melodic, harmonic, rhythmic, and form related components.  Many assignments will be completed with the use of notation and sequencing software. 

MU311 - Commercial-Jazz Arranging

A study of the technical skills necessary to adapt music from a variety of sources for various instrumental, vocal, and mixed ensembles.  Demonstrating the skills necessary to arrange music for all levels and sizes of ensembles is an important component of the class.  Arranging will be approached from a commercial and jazz harmonic structure.  Many assignments will be completed with the use of notation and sequencing software.

MU314 - Advanced Conducting-Choral

A study of conducting opportunities unique to choral ensembles; historical style and performance practice; choral organization, rehearsal procedures, and programming; major works analysis; and coordination of choral and instrumental performing forces. 

MU316 - Choral Techniques

 One semester course designed to survey techniques of score study, rehearsal and performance in the choral art. Practical aspects of preparing and rehearsing choral music will be stressed. Students will assess strengths, determine needs, research solutions, and practice presentations. 

MU317 - Advanced Conducting - Instrumental

 A study of conducting opportunities unique to instrumental ensembles; historical style and performance practice; band and orchestral organization, rehearsal procedures, and programming; and major works analysis. 

MU321 - Music History I

 A survey of the Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque Periods. 

MU322 - Music History II

A survey of the Classic, Romantic, Impressionist and Contemporary periods.

MU324 - Choral Literature

A survey of choral music with particular attention to programming literature appropriate to available resources (elementary, middle, secondary schools, churches, community ensembles). 

MU335 - Instrumentation

A study of the technical skills necessary for arranging and adapting music from a variety of sources for various instrumental ensembles.  Students will use software tools extensively for creation of their original works.  

MU337 - Choral Arranging

A study of technical skills necessary for developing a melody into a complete setting for a particular choral combination with or without accompaniment. Considerations include available vocal resources at elementary school, secondary school, and adult age levels; accompaniments; two-, three-, and four-part arranging in a variety of styles.  Students will use software tools extensively for the creation of their arrangements.  

MU341 - Advanced Diction

Advanced Diction is designed to refine foreign language skills for singers, concentrating on and identifying the unique features of each language through written and  vocal practice as well as analysis of language pronunciation through listening.

MU357 - A-B-C Repertoire

 A survey of solo repertoire for the appropriate instrument or voice, covering historic periods and styles; appropriate repertoire for various occasions and levels of performer proficiency; comparisons of editions and sources. Sections offered on demand for voice, piano, organ. MU357A Vocal Repertoire MU257B Piano Repertoire MU357C Organ Repertoire

MU358 - A-B-D Studio Pedagogy

The study of pedagogical approaches, applied through supervised studio teaching. Emphasis is on studio procedures, methods and materials, professional organizations and ethics. Offered on demand to advanced applied music students in piano, organ, or voice. MU358A Piano Pedagogy MU358B Organ Pedagogy MU358D Vocal Pedagogy

MU360 - Special Problems

Independent study or research on a subject of interest to an individual student. May be taken for 1-5 credit hours.

MU368 - Internship and Field Experiences

1-5 credit hours each semester

MU380 - Senior Thesis

 Intensive supervised study to enhance total musicianship and to increase preparation for the student's role as teacher, performer, graduate student. Special emphasis is placed on music history, music literature, and pedagogy. Open only to Senior majoring in Music.

MU390 - Special Topics

Advanced course on a topic not included in the regular curriculum. May be taken for 1-5 credit hours.

MU391 - Junior Recital

Junior Recital - one credit hour

MU401 - Worship - Commercial Music Rehearsal Techniques

An examination of the practical and pedagogical aspects of music ministry and commercial music ensembles, including organizing and instructing musicians, selecting or arranging music appropriate for the ensemble, pastoral leadership, information management, facilities, budget, scheduling, and resources.  Junior standing required.

MU407 - Analysis of Contemporary Music

This course is a study of theoretical concepts used in analyzing music from 1900 to the present. 

MU423 - American Music

A survey and capstone course of American musical culture including ethnic, folk, jazz, and commercial manifestations. Particular emphasis on continuing traditions of Western European art music in the United States in the 20th Century.

MU465 - Form and Analysis

 A capstone course, in which students explore the major forms and structural units in music from the Baroque to the late 19th Century, with an analysis synthesis, and written communication. 

MU468 - Music Internship

Field Experience.

MU471 - Composition I

 Focus on compositional and analytical techniques of the past century.  Students will use software tools extensively for the creation of their original works.

MU492 - Senior Recital

Senior recital - one credit hour

MU507 Graduate Theory

Developing analytical skills that help musicians create an informed interpretation of a piece of music is the focus of this course. This course will also include a review of analytical techniques.

MU514A Advanced Conducting-Choral

The study and refinement of conducting skills is the focus of this course. Attention will be given to exploring musical scores and preparing appropriate gestures.

MU514B Advanced Conducting-Instrumental

The study and refinement of conducting skills is the focus of this course. Attention will be given to exploring musical scores and preparing appropriate gestures.

MU521 Graduate Music History

This course is designed as a survey of music history. Emphasis will be placed on assessing the impact of historical events and culture on music and distinguishing stylistic trends through aural recognition.

MU531 Introduction to Research in Music Education

This course is designed to acquaint students with the process of completing the Master's Report. Special emphasis will be placed on refining editing skills, using APA format, and becoming acquainted with academic music education research.

MU541 Woodwind Pedagogy

The purpose of this course is to examine advanced methods of teaching woodwind musicians.

MU543 Brass Pedagogy

The purpose of this course is to examine advanced methods of teaching brass musicians.

MU545 Percussion Pedagogy

The purpose of this course is to examine advanced methods of teaching percussionists.

MU547 Vocal Pedagogy I

The purpose of this course is to examine advanced methods of teaching vocalists with an emphasis on technical information.

MU549 Vocal Pedagogy II

The purpose of this course is to examine advanced methods of teaching vocalists with an emphasis on practical applications of diction, repertoire selection, and musicianship.

MU557A Literature Analysis-Choral

This course is designed to allow students to develop familiarity with music literature, develop skills in assessing the teaching challenges of a piece, and exploring resources for finding music.

MU557B Literature Analysis-Instrumental

This course is designed to allow students to develop familiarity with music literature, develop skills in assessing the teaching challenges of a piece, and exploring resources for finding music.

MU562A Rehearsal Techniques-Choral

This course is designed to investigate effective methods of organizing an efficient large ensemble rehearsal. Emphasis is placed on effective teaching techniques and planning.

MU562B Rehearsal Techniques-Instrumental

This course is designed to investigate effective methods of organizing an efficient large ensemble rehearsal. Emphasis is placed on effective teaching techniques and planning.

MU570 Organization and Administration of the School Music Program

This course is designed to expand understanding of strategies for developing, organizing, and administering quality music education programs.

MU580 Current Issues

This course is designed to encourage exploration of the current issues relevant to music education. Attention is given to using technology in the music classroom, understanding the role of music in the schools, historical foundations, philosophical debates, and current discussion about curriculum.

MU599 Masters Report

In the academic year following the completion of regular coursework students will prepare the Master's Report. The Master's Report will provide an opportunity for students to demonstrate mastery of the outcomes of every course in the Master of Music Education program. Students will prepare a concert at their home school using the tools they have developed during their course of study at CMU. Concurrently, students will document their preparation. The revised and edited version of this documentation will be the Master's Report.

NU304 - Nursing Research

This course introduces the concepts, processes, and applications of nursing research. The research role of the nurse in decision making and clinical practice will be examined. Students will read and critique research on nursing practice and will discuss problems and challenges in conducting nursing research. Throughout the course, there will be opportunities to practice various aspects of the research process (thinking of research question, planning study designs, evaluating measurement methods). The student will develop a research proposal and complete a formal paper on the proposal. 8-week hybrid format.

NU306 End-of-Life Care

This course introduces the student to the theoretical foundations of end-of-life care.  Through the use of a caring model which focuses on culturally sensitive communication processes, the nurse becomes a facilitator of holistic, patient-centered care for the terminally ill patient and family. 

NU307 - Adaptation Nursing Applications

(3 lecture/2 clinical hours). This course provides an introduction to basic nursing skills, terminology, and need states. Nursing applications include skills and adaptation nursing process practiced in the laboratory setting progressing to the healthcare provider setting. Clinical contact hours meet the Missouri State Board of Nursing 3:1 ratio for credit awarded.

NU308 - Health Assessment

This course allows the student to develop the assessment skills necessary to provide competent care for clients of varying ages and ethnic backgrounds applying the adaptation nursing model. Health assessment is the gathering of subjective and objective data regarding a client's state of health. The knowledge gained in this course will assist the nurse in holistically assessing the adaptation level of client, family, and community across the lifespan. Students participate in the scheduled weekly Skills Lab and are expected to use the Skills Lab on an independently scheduled basis to practice the necessary psycho-motor skills for completing a physical assessment. Lab contact hours meet the Carnegie 2:1 ratio for credit awarded.

NU309 - Psychosocial Integrity

(2.5 lecture/0.5 clinical hours). This course focuses on the adaptive responses in self-concept, role function, and interdependence modes which promote the goals of adaptation and the integrity of the individual, family, and community. Communication intervention techniques are examined. Much of the clinical exposure is in the community setting. Credit hours awarded meet the Missouri State Board of Nursing 3:1 contact-to-credit hour guideline.

NU312 - Pharmacology I

A study of routes and methods of medication administration along with an introduction to basic medication classes and their uses. This course provides the initial pharmacological knowledge needed for nursing practice. Additional aspects of this topic are addressed in NU313 Pharmacology II, the second of this two-course series. Lecture and Seminar.

NU313 - Pharmacology II

This course builds on the concepts introduced in NU312 Pharmacology I and provides a study of actions and side effects of functional groups of drugs. Attention is given to diet, age, and other factors influencing drug response. Nursing interventions and client education are stressed. Lecture and Seminar.

NU320 Adaptation Nursing in the Community

This course focuses on the inter-relationship of community health principles and adaptation nursing.  Lecture and seminar topics include community assessment, family assessment and dynamics, role and function of the community health nurse, crisis intervention, epidemiology, legal/ethical issues of practice, economics of community/home health agencies, and patient education.  Application of theory content will be through exercises designed to demonstrate clinical understanding of public health nursing.  3 lecture hours, 1 clinical hour.

NU321 - Public Health and Community Nursing Concepts

(2.5 lecture/0.5 clinical hours). This course focuses on the interrelationship of community health principles and adaptation nursing. Application of principles will be in community health and community-based settings. Credit hours awarded meet the Missouri State Board of Nursing 3:1 contact-to-credit hour guideline for clinical aspects

NU325 Historical Trends in Nursing

This course focuses on the historical development of nursing from biblical time to the present day.  Lectures and seminars focus on historical occurrences and trends in nursing and the current relationship between nursing and the health care system.   

NU334 - Evidence Based Adaptation Nursing I

(5 lecture/2 clinical hours). This course focuses on concepts of adaptation nursing related to protective needs: integumentary, oncologic, immunologic, protective sensory systems, activity and rest, and safety; and metabolic needs: fluid, electrolyte, and acid-base balance and problems of nutrition, digestion, elimination, and excretion. The adaptation model and evidence-based practice are used to promote the highest potential for individuals and families of varying developmental levels and cultures within a variety of healthcare settings. The lab, clinical, and simulation contact hours meet the Missouri State Board of Nursing guidelines for the credit hours awarded.

NU336 - Evidence Based Adaptation Nursing II

(6 lecture/2 clinical hours). This course focuses on concepts of adaptation nursing related to oxygenation needs: circulatory, respiratory, and hematologic systems; and regulatory needs: problems of the neurologic system and the endocrine system. The adaptation model and evidence-based practice are used to promote the highest potential for individuals and families of varying developmental levels and cultures within a variety of healthcare settings. The lab, clinical, and simulation contact hours meet the Missouri State Board of Nursing guidelines for the credit hours awarded.

NU360 Gerontology II

The focus of this course is to build on the concepts of Gerontology I.  Content includes physiology of aging, cognitive changes, cultural dimensions, wellness, environmental concerns, stress, nutrition, dementia, and polypharmacy.  

NU360 or 460 Special Problems

1-3 hours each semester.  A directed, independent study program on a topic of special interest to the student and approved and guided by an instructor.

NU360 Special Problems

1-5 hours. Independent study or research on a subject of interest to an individual student.

NU361 Gerontology I

The focus of this course is on theories, concepts, and issues related to aging with specific consideration to how these affect current and projected increases in the elderly population.  Individual, social, and political implications of the culturally complex nature of these populations are integrated throughout the lessons.  

NU369 Rural Health

This course focuses on health issues from a rural health perspective.  Content includes a study of the multifaceted dimensions of health, illness, the health care delivery system, populations with special needs, occupational accidents, and health beliefs of rural residents.  Also included is information from a U.S.  and international viewpoint.  

NU390 or 490

1-3 hours.  Advanced course on a topic not included in the regular curriculum.

NU451 - Adaptation Nursing Practicum

(1 directed study/5 clinical hours). (Capstone) This course affords the student the opportunity to apply adaptation nursing concepts through an individualized nursing practice under the supervision of a faculty member and a clinical preceptor. The student will be required to demonstrate fulfillment of course objectives through evidence-based practice.

NU452 - NCLEX Review

This course is designed to increase student readiness for the NCLEX-RN examination. Concurrent enrollment in NU 451.

NU455 Professional Issues, Leadership, and Management

This course prepares the student for the expanded role as nurse leader/manager.  Lectures and seminars focus on management theories, leadership style, change theory, interpersonal and inter-professional relationships, and current issues/trends in practice and education.

NU456 - Leadership and Management

Prepares the student for the role as nurse leader/ manager. Focuses on theory and application of leadership and management skills. Includes pertinent aspects of the economic, regulatory, and legal aspects of health care as well as health care systems in the United States that impact the role of the nurse leader/manager. Lecture and seminar.

NU460 - Special Problems

Independent study or research on a subject of interest to an individual student. May be taken for 1-5 credit hours.

NU461 - Gerontology

Study of the aging process from both a physical and a developmental perspective and its impact on nursing care and considerations. Lecture and seminar.

NU480 Integrated Concepts of Adaptation Nursing

This course builds on the concepts of past nursing courses and allows the student the opportunity to apply these concepts through an individualized nursing practice under the supervision of a faculty advisor and a project mentor.  The student will be required to develop a specific set of learning objectives for the selected area of clinical practice.  This flexible approach to learning allows the student the opportunity to develop expertise in a selected area of practice.  Students must pass the practical, written, and oral components of this course to graduate. (3 hours of clinical project and 2 hours of didactic)

NU500 Advanced Health Assessment

The focus of this course is development of advanced health history and assessment skills. Discussion will center on interpreting data, recognizing deviations from normal, recognizing actual and potential health problems, and determining the nursing/medical diagnosis. Cultural diversity and ethical issues will be considered. 4 hours: 3 didactic, 1 hour clinical (40 contact hours) with Shadow Health.

NU502 - Advanced Pathophysiology

The purpose of this course is to build on the student's existing knowledge of pathophysiologic alterations and apply that knowledge to selected patient populations. The focus will be on alterations in body systems, pathophysiologic changes and associated signs and symptoms across the life span.

NU504 - Advanced Pharmacology

The focus of this course is on Pharmacotherapeutics and the implications for nursing practice. Treatment guidelines, indications, contraindications, prescription writing, drug law, and drug information resources will be discussed using case studies.

NU508 - Epidemiology

This course weaves the discipline of epidemiology with the role of the Clinical Nurse Leader. Topics include the history of epidemiology, disease transmission dynamics, public health surveillance, legal/ethical issues, culture, and prevention. The statistical measures of epidemiology are applied to patient safety and quality of care through the role of the Clinical Nurse Leader. Students will be provided the opportunity to further explore an epidemiological topic of choice, including emerging infectious diseases, chronic diseases, genetics, environment, and pandemics.

NU509 - Curriculum Development

This course examines theoretical foundations, principles and issues in curriculum design.  It explores design, systematic evaluation and function of curriculum structure.  Considers assumptions, methods and resources in the design and evaluation of various curricula in formal and practice settings.

NU510 Advanced Professional Role - CNL

Students will examine the role of Master's prepared nurses with attention to the Clinical Nurse Leader. The students will gain a working knowledge of the concepts of leadership, communication micro-systems, quality, education and ANA standards and ethics.

NU511 - Advanced Professional Role - NE

Students will examine the role of the Master's prepared nursing educators with attention to the factors of historic nursing education, responsibility to students and institution, legal and ethical issues, and the accreditation process.

NU512 - Health Care Finance-Policy-Economics

The course introduces students to health care finance and policy. Students will develop an understanding of health care economics, the health care system, the development of health policy, and the role of the advance practice nurse in the process.

NU513 - Evaluation Methods

The purpose of this course is to prepare nurse educators to appropriately and effectively evaluate students in both the classroom and clinical settings. The course will focus on developing effective classroom and clinical evaluation tools; assembling and administering exams; analyzing exam results; analyzing the social, ethical, and legal issues related to evaluation and testing; and developing an understanding of overall program assessment and evaluation.

NU514 - Theoretical Frameworks

This course presents a variety of conceptual and theoretical frameworks and allows students to examine both nursing and contemporary theories from other disciplines.

NU515 - Instructional Strategies

This course explores the role of educator, including classroom management and diverse student needs. Students examines teaching strategies as applied to nursing education, instructional methods and best practices.  Emphasis is placed on student participation in the learning process and learning principles.  Key theories of human nature, culture and society related to teaching and learning are introduced.

NU516 - Health Care Issues

This course assists students to explore current issues and events impacting professional nursing practice. The impact of systems thinking, diversity, health literacy, health care reform, social factors, economic responsibilities, and ethical and legal issues influencing healthcare will be examined.

NU517 - Issue and Trends in Post-Secondary Education

This course encompasses a foundational understanding of the current and historical structures and governance of post-secondary education. Students will explore the external issues of accountability facing post-secondary education such as accreditation, state and federally legislated regulations, and the economic factors of affordability. Current and historically relevant issues related to faculty, academic freedom, research, funding, students, and technology will be explored.

NU518 - Evidence-Based Client Care Management

This course introduces evidence-based practice at the bedside leading to continuous quality improvement in the clinical nurse leader role. Students will identify best practices by appraising evidence for potential solutions, plan a practice change project, and explore EBP models to evaluate outcomes. This course requires completion of 40 clinical/project hours.

NU519 - Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing Education

This course introduces evidence-based practices in nursing education leading to continuous quality improvement int eh nurse educator role. Students will identify clinical/classroom questions, search and appraise evidence for potential solutions, plan a practice change, identify theoretical framework, explore EBP models to evaluate outcomes, and develop a strategy to disseminate findings. This course is designed for both academic and staff educators.

NU522 - Clinical Nurse Leader Residency

This course includes the 300 contact hour clinical experience which will provide students with an opportunity to work in the role of clinical nurse leader under the guidance of a mentor. Students share progress on their clinical activities through online discussions.

NU523 - Nurse Educator Practicum

This course integrates the concepts of NU 511, 513, 515, 517, 519 and provides students the opportunity to demonstrate these concepts in their final project. The final project will be completed in 200-300 hours.

NU590 - Residency Preparation

Students will identify clinical activities and create objectives to fulfill the 300 hour clinical residency requirement in NU522.

PE111 - Wellness

The recognition of physical fitness and physical well being as expressions of strength of character is rooted in the ancient Greek and modern Olympic Games. Both the study of physical well being and the practice of physical well being have a long tradition in higher education. Strength of character includes (1) understanding the nature and bases of physical well being, (2) the development of physical as well as mental disciplines, (3) habits of life that support physical as well as mental well being, and (4) enhanced awareness of the meaning and applications of sportsmanship. This course includes both classroom and laboratory experiences to move students toward these dimensions of character formation. This course is part of the General Education Common Core requirement. (Army Physical Training fulfills this requirement.)

PE202 - Motor Learning and Motor Development

The study of scientific principles, concepts, and theories related to motor learning and human behavior in sport and physical education. The focus of the course is to introduce students to information on motor learning and acquisition of motor skills and encompasses three areas: motor learning, motor control, and motor development.

PE210 - Personal and Community Health

Education majors study the personal health problems and the safety education of students PK through grade 12. Areas of study include growth and development, nutrition, sex and drug education, personal hygiene, and how these areas relate to the students and the community.

PE212 - First Aid - Community CPR

This course provides certification for first aid and CPR.

PE216 - Nutrition and Athletic Performance

Fundamental principles of human nutrition and their application essential to health, from a physiological point of view. The focus of this course is to learn about nutrient requirements, food sources and adequate diet selection in regards to the effects and benefits to athletic performance.

PE217 - Foundations of Physical Education

Historic and philosophic analysis of physical education emphasizing physical education as an academic discipline, professional opportunities, and associated fields. Recommended for freshmen. K-12.

PE221 - Psychological and Sociological Aspects of Physical Education

This course applies the principles and scientific methods from psychology to study human behavior in physical education. It also includes the study of the sociological perspective of sports in today's society. Students will explore achievement, motivation, anxiety, self-confidence, cohesion, adherence and leadership in sports and physical education. They will also examine sport-related behaviors as they occur in social and cultural contexts.

PE322 - Teaching Elementary School Physical Education

Fundamental skills, sports, and games for the elementary school physical education program. Students will study and develop knowledge, understanding participation and application in teaching motor skills in the primary grades. This course includes a minimal amount of time in clinical experiences. K-9.

PE323 - First Aid, Care, and Prevention of Injuries

Lecture, demonstration and practice of the techniques used in the care and prevention of athletic injuries.

PE327 Physiology of Exercise

Emphasis is on the study of the effects of exercise on the various systems of the body and its relationship on the physiological aspects of human nature (K-12).

PE328 Adapted Physical Education

Methods of teaching and program development for special needs students in physical education for Grades Pre-K to 12.

PE339 - Methods and Techniques for Tests and Measurements in Physical Education

Designed to study methods and techniques for testing and measuring the basic factors on which the performance of a wide variety of physical education activities are based. Major emphasis is on the measurement of skills, knowledge and attitudes pertaining to physical education (K-12).

PE440 Program Design

This course is an advanced course for strength and conditioning majors focusing on independent research in design, application, and evaluation of exercise prescription. It includes a professional supervised internship to apply current research in training methods to practical experiences.

PH111 - General Physics

A survey of physics including an introduction to mechanics, thermodynamics, fluids, wave characteristics, and sound. Three lectures. MOTR PHYS 150 Physics I Core 42 Website

PH111L - General Physics Lab

Lab exercises that accompany PH111. MOTR PHYS 150L Physics I with Lab Core 42 Website

PH112 - General Physics II

A survey of physics including an introduction to electricity, wave characteristics, optics and nuclear structure. Three lectures.

PH112L - General Physics II Lab

Lab exercises that accompany PH112. Must be taken concurrently with PH112.

PH205 - Calculus Physics I

A unified survey of physics including an introduction to mechanics, thermodynamics, fluids and acoustics. This course is presented at the mathematical level of calculus. Three lectures.  

PH205L - Calculus Physics Lab

Lab exercises that accompany PH205. MOTR PHYS 200L Advanced Physics I with Lab Core 42 Website

PL101 Introducation to Logic

Introduction to the study of logic. Attention is given to both the analysis of formal arguments and the examination of arguments in ordinary language. Special attention is given to induction and informal fallacies.

PL102 - Critical Thinking

Students explore the skills for analyzing and constructing arguments, including skills such as: identifying premises and conclusions; putting arguments in logical order; recognizing and revising types of informal fallacies; drawing conclusions using deductive argument forms; evaluating arguments for validity; and constructing one’s own valid arguments.

PL105 Introduction to Philosophy

The nature of philosophy and its methods; the problems of knowledge, reality, ethics, aesthetics and religion.

PL106 - Introduction to Western Philosophy

Students explore the nature of philosophy and its methods. Attention is given to fundamental questions of the Western philosophical traditions, including the problems of knowledge, reality, ethics, aesthetics, and religion. MOTR PHIL 100 Introduction to Philosophy Core 42 Website

PL225 - Philosophy of Religion

This is a study of the nature of religion and of the relation of philosophy to theology. Attention is given to such problems as the existence of God, knowledge of God, faith, religious language, evil, immortality, and eschatology. Cross-listed with RL225.

PL260 - Special Problems

This is an independent study or research on a subject of interest to an individual student. May be taken for 1-5 credit hours.

PL268 - Internship and Field Experiences

May be taken for 1-3 credit hours

PL290 - Special Topics

This is an intermediate-level course on a topic not included in the regular curriculum. May be taken for 1-5 credit hours.

PL306 - Ethics and the Professions

After an introduction to ethics, ethical theories, and the art of critical thinking about ethical issues, students will examine ethical issues specific to their chosen professions. Emphasis in the past has been on ethics and the sciences (medicine, experimentation, genetics), the environment (corporation vs. individual rights, responsibilities to animals and to the environment), and philosophy of law (justice, equality, rights, responsibility, and punishment). Emphasis is on case studies.

PL310 - Ethics and Leadership

Leadership uninformed by character is likely empty at best and disastrous at worst. Thus, the course will examine leadership styles and the ethics of leadership as a consequence of or a derivative of adequate character and a strong sense of personal responsibility. The course will examine "good," Relativism, the relation of character and virtue, leadership responsibilities, and personal responsibility.

PL311 - The Study of Knowledge

Students explore the areas of knowledge, belief, and truth. Students will be introduced to concepts such as skepticism and justification. Students will explore what counts as knowledge and how these issues affect the areas of morality, science, math, and society.

PL321 - Asian Philosophy and Religion

Students explore philosophical and religious traditions of Asia. Traditions treated may include Hinduism, Buddhism in South and East Asia, Confucianism and Daoism. Emphasis is placed on the philosophical worldviews articulated in their respective texts. Cross-listed with RL321

PL340 - Comparative Religion and Philosophy

This course treats a theme across a number of religious and philosophical traditions. Special attention is given to comparative methodology. Themes might include: evil, saints and sages, mysticism, food, etc. Cross-listed with RL340.

PL360 - Special Problems

Independent study or research on a subject of interest to an individual student. May be taken for 1-5 hours.

PL368 - Internship and Field Experiences

May be taken for 1-3 credit hours

PL390 - Special Topics

This is an advanced course on a topic not included in the regular curriculum. May be taken for 1-5 credit hours.

PS101 - Introduction to American National, State, and Local Government

A study of the structure and functions of national, state, and local government. This course fulfills the state civics requirement. MOTR POSC 101 American Government Core 42 Website

PS103 - Introduction to Missouri Civics

An introduction to the Missouri Constitution, state political institutions, and processes. This course will fulfill the Missouri State Civics requirement for transfer students who have completed coursework from a non-Missouri institution in American Government or a survey of American History I or an equivalent course which covers the U.S. Constitution

PS190 - Special Topics

Introductory course on a topic not included in the regular curriculum. Course may be taken for 1-5 credit hours.

PS200 - International Problems and Relations

Introduction to principles of international affairs, including theory and methodology of world politics, nature of power and its control, competition and cooperation among nations.

PS204 - Global Crime

An examination of international crime operations including sea and air piracy, smuggling and terrorism. Cross-listed with CJ204.

PS260 - Special Problems

Independent study or research on a subject of interest to an individual student. May be taken for 1-5 credit hours.

PS268 - Internship and Field Experiences

May be taken for 1-5 credit hours

PS290 - Special Topics

Intermediate-level course on a topic not included in the regular curriculum.

PS307 - The History and Politics of Missouri

A survey of the social, economic, intellectual, and political history of Missouri from prehistory to the twentieth century. Fulfills the state civics requirement. Cross-listed with HI307

PS308 American Constitutional Law and the Judicial Process

Study of the leading American constitutional principles and major decisions of the Supreme Court. An analysis of the role played by judges and courts in public policy formation. Cross-listed with CJ308.

PS309 - Law in American Society

A study of the role of law and legal institutions in the American system of justice. Cross-listed with CJ309

PS318 - American Legislative Politics

A detailed examination of current research into the structure and function of American legislative institutions at the national, state and local levels

PS319 - The American Presidency, Past and Present

An analysis of the evolution and contemporary operation of the office of the presidency with special emphasis on the administrations of selected presidents. Cross-listed with HI319

PS320 - The American Way of War

A survey of the American military during peace and war from Colonial times to the present. Major American and world political leaders and their top military commanders are examined in their social and historical contexts. Cross-listed with HI320.

PS322 - Comparative Political Systems

An introduction to the comparative study of national political systems. Attention is focused on the role of political culture and historical evolution as determinants of political development. Cross-listed with HI322

PS330 - Principles of Public Administration

Introductory survey of public administration with reference to organization, personnel management, financial administration, and administrative process. Cross-listed with CJ330

PS331 - Research Design and Data Analysis in the Social Sciences

An introduction to research design, social measurement, analytic strategies and applied statistical techniques relevant to the interpretation of social phenomena. Cross-listed with CJ/HI/PY/SO331

PS333 Public Policy Analysis

An introduction to the tools of the public policy planner and budget analyst with emphasis on the role of policy analysis in program design, implementation, and review.

PS334 - Applied Quantitative Data Analysis in the Social Sciences

A study of the application of quantitative analytic techniques to data in the social sciences. Cross-listed with CJ/HI/PY/SO334

PS355 - Topics Seminar in Area Studies

This seminar will familiarize students with the modern political history and contemporary political and social dynamics of the nations of a selected region of the world. The seminar will examine the political and social history and social evolution of the designated region. Discussion and reading will focus on the political and social evolution of the region since World War II, the arrangement of political institutions, the key leadership dynamics, and the overall contemporary political situation in the nations of the region. There will be assigned readings and discussion topics for each seminar meeting, and students will be expected to follow contemporary developments in the politics of the region. Each student will be expected to complete a research paper on some facet of the politics of one state within the region on which the seminar is focusing. May be repeated with different designated regions.

PS360 - Special Problems

Independent study or research on a subject of interest to an individual student. May be taken for 1-5 credit hours.

PS368 - Internship and Field Experiences

Independent study or research on a subject of interest to an individual student. May be taken for 1-5 credit hours.

PS390 - Special Topics

Advanced course on a topic not included in the regular curriculum. May be taken for 1-5 credit hours.

PS500 International Relations

Provides an examination of the major theories which seek to explain international conflict and cooperation. Meets MEd Standard 1.

PS501 American Public School Law

A study of the American legal system and the court decisions impacting education. Emphasis will be placed on the legal rights and responsibilities of students, teachers, administrators, and others involved in the public education process.

PS505 Modern Political Thought

A study of the political thought from Machiavelli to the end of the 19th Century. Meets MEd Standard 1.

PS508 Law and the Judicial Process

Provides an overview of the operation of courts and the legal system within American Government. Meets MEd Standard 1.

PS518 Congress

This course will entail an advanced study of the legislative process, structure, powers, organization, political control, and procedures of the United States Congress. Meets MEd Standard 1.

PS519 The American Presidency

This course will examine the evolution of the office of the American presidency and the operation of the executive branch of the American federal government. Meets MEd Standard 1.

PS530 Public Administration

Introduction to the study of the public administration including the critical role that public bureaucracy plays in the nation-state, and the historical evolution of public administration as an academic field. Meets MEd Standard 1.

PY101 - General Psychology

A survey of many factors that influence behavior and the techniques that psychologists use to study these factors. Major topics include heredity and physiology; development; learning and thinking; motivation and emotion; personality; and psychological adjustment, disorders, and treatment. MOTR PSYC 100 General Psychology Core 42 Website

PY190 - Special Topics

Introductory course on a topic not included in the regular curriculum. May be taken for 1-5 credit hours.

PY204 - Experimental Psychology

A survey of many factors that influence behavior and the techniques that psychologists use to study these factors. Major topics include heredity and physiology; development; learning and thinking; motivation and emotion; personality; and psychological adjustment, disorders, and treatment.

PY210 - Educational Psychology

Introduction of general psychological theories to the prospective elementary and secondary teacher. There is a brief introduction to developmental stages, learning theories, individual differences and motivation, with application to the classroom in teaching methods, content presentation, and evaluation procedures. (PY210 cannot be counted for psychology credit in the degree programs of Psychology majors or minors without the written permission of the chair of the Division of Social Sciences.)

PY211 - Psychology of Personal Adjustment

The study of individual differences and self-analysis of cognitive processes, emotional responses to normal and/or traumatic life events. Limitations and options for appropriate behavior will be explored through discussion, testing and evaluations

PY223 - Developmental Psychology

An examination of various aspects of physical, cognitive, and psychosocial development from conception through late adulthood. Emphasis is placed on child and adolescent development.

PY238 - Applied Psychology

An examination of the applications of the facts, principles, and techniques of psychology to a broad range of human endeavors. The core of the course consists of an introduction to the various career paths in psychology. Prerequisite: PY101or PY210.

PY260 - Special Problems

Independent study or research on a subject of interest to an individual student. May be taken for 1-5 credit hours.

PY268 - Internship and Field Experiences

May be taken for 1-5 credit hours.

PY290 - Special Topics

Intermediate-level course on a topic not included in the regular curriculum. May be taken for 1-5 credit hours.

PY301 - Abnormal Psychology

A study of the causes and treatments of behavior disorders. Special attention is given to relevant diagnostic and legal issues.

PY308 - Personality

An examination of the major theoretical paradigms and research studies pertaining to the human personality. Psychodynamic, existential, humanistic, trait, social learning, and narrative approaches to understanding personality dynamics are reviewed.

PY321 - Family Relationships and Values

A study of interpersonal relations in courtship and marriage across cultures, with an emphasis on the currently changing values in the United States. There will be a focus on cultural, social, cognitive and emotional bases of intimacy, commitment, and family roles. Cross-listed with SO321.

PY324 - Social Psychology

A study of how people think about, influence, and relate to one another. The focus is on the individual within group situations, including both the effects of the group on the individual and the effects of the individual on the group. Specific topics include conformity, persuasion, aggression, altruism, and attraction. Cross-listed with SO324.

PY331 - Research Design and Data Analysis in the Social Sciences

An introduction to research design, social measurement, analytic strategies and applied statistical techniques relevant to the interpretation of social phenomena. Cross-listed with CJ/HI/PS/SO 331.

PY332 Cognitive Processes and Applications

A study of cognitive processes such as perception, thinking, learning, and problem-solving. Special attention will be given to various applications of cognitive theory and research.

PY334 - Applied Quantitative Data Analysis in the Social Sciences

A study of the application of quantitative analytic techniques to data in the social sciences. Cross-listed with CJ/HI/PS/SO334.

PY342 - Psychology of the Exceptional Child

A study of techniques for increasing the academic, social, and vocational competence of disabled individuals. Attention is given to causal factors and behavioral characteristics associated with different exceptionalities

PY343 - Psychology of the Exceptional Child Practicum

Applied experiences working with disabled individuals. This course includes 18-20 clock hours of clinical experiences.

PY345 - Learning

An overview of the principles of animal and human learning. Special attention is given to the acquisition, retention, and extinction of learned behavior patterns.

PY346 - Sensation and Perception

This course will examine the process by which we interpret and organize sensory information to produce our conscious experience of objects and relationships among objects.

PY348 - Health Psychology

An introduction to the application of psychological theories and research to our understanding, prediction, and promotion of health behavior. Course topics include stress, exercise, nutrition, sexual behavior, alcohol, smoking, chronic diseases, and terminal illnesses.

PY349 - Biological Psychology

An introduction to biological and physiological roots of human behavior, including, an examination of the structure and function of the nervous systems and how it relates to the regulation of bodily functions, sexual behavior, emotions, sleep, learning and memory. Other topics include psychopharmacology, sensation and perception, and neurological/psychological disorders.

PY351 - Introduction to Counseling

A study of basic theories and methods of counseling and psychotherapy, including: behavioral, cognitive, and humanistic approaches to counseling, client analysis, and interviewing techniques. Emphasizes goals, responsibilities, and ethical problems in the counseling relationship. Cross-listed with SO351.

PY352 - Group Processes

A study of the properties, structure, and dynamics of groups and inter-group relations, as well as an introduction to group therapy techniques. Specific topics include group decision-making and problem-solving, leadership, communication patterns within and between groups, and therapy groups. The psychological effects of participation in groups are also examined.

PY353 - Industrial - Organizational - Psychology

An introduction to the ways that psychological theory and research can be applied to understand and increase the effectiveness of people in the workplace. Course topics include personnel selection, training, performance appraisal, work motivation, morale, and job satisfaction.

PY360 - Special Problems

Independent study or research on a subject of interest to an individual student. May be taken for 1-5 credit hours.

PY368 - Internship and Field Experiences

May be taken for 1-5 credit hours.

PY390 - Special Topics

Advanced course on a topic not included in the regular curriculum. May be taken for 1-5 credit hours.

PY480 - Senior Thesis

This is a capstone course open only to juniors and seniors majoring in Psychology. This is a Senior thesis seminar. To receive credit in this course, all students must complete a directed research paper and successfully defend it before the faculty of the Division of Social Sciences.

PY523 Human Growth and Development

This course explores the biological, psychological, and sociological factors that impact the individual throughout the human life span-from birth to death. Meets MEd Standard 1.

PY543 Advanced Psychology of the Exceptional Child

This course is a study of general psychology theories to the prospective special education teacher. There is a brief introduction to developmental stages, learning theories, individual differences, and motivation with application in the special education classroom regarding teaching methods, content presentations, and evaluation procedures. Meets MEd Standard 1.

RL122 - Religion and the Human Adventure

This is an introduction to the ways in which religion provides meaning and purpose for human life. The course includes a study of a variety of religious traditions, beliefs, and practices. Prerequisite to all upper-level courses in Religion. MOTR RELG 100 World Religion Core 42 Website

RL190 - Special Topics

This is an introductory course on a topic not included in the regular curriculum. May be taken for 1-3 credit hours.

RL201 - Old Testament

This is a survey of Old Testament literature, concentrating on the faith of Israel and its relevance for today.

RL202 - New Testament

This is a survey of New Testament literature, concentrating on the faith of the early church and its relevance for today.

RL205 - Introduction to Church Leadership

This course provides the practical framework for developing and executing leadership skills in a church setting. It is designed, in particular, to assist students pursuing the Religion and Church Leadership major but can be of use to other students as well. The course does not meet the Common Core leadership requirement and does not meet the Tier Two Humanities requirement.

RL225 - Philosophy of Religion

This is a study of the nature of religion and of the relation of philosophy to theology. Attention is given to such problems as the existence of God, knowledge of God, faith, religious language, evil, immortality, and eschatology. Cross-listed with PL225.

RL260 - Special Problems

This is an independent study or research on a subject of interest to an individual student. May be taken for 1-5 credit hours.

RL268 - Internship and Field Experiences

May be taken for 1-3 credit hours.

RL290 - Special Topics

This is an intermediate-level course on a topic not included in the regular curriculum. May be taken for 1-3 credit hours.

RL301 - Mission and the Message of Jesus

This is a study of the four gospels—using the tools of critical scholarship—to understand Jesus and his teachings and the faith of the early Christian community which produced these writings.

RL302 - Paul and the Early Church

This is a study of the Pauline epistles, of the Acts of the Apostles, and of non-orthodox Christian traditions that sought expression during the formative years of Christianity.

RL303 - The Prophets

This is a study of the origins of Old Testament prophecy and of the contributions to the religion of Israel by Amos, Hosea, Isaiah, Jeremiah, and others.

RL304.504 Religion and the Public Schools

Students will survey constitutional issues concerning the expression of religion and the study of religion in the public school setting, including ways that world religions are or may be integrated into the school curriculum. Meets MEd Standard 6.

RL310 - Biblical Literature and the Ancient World

This is a survey of the archaeological records and of the material history of the ancient civilizations of Mesopotamia, Egypt, and Palestine, with emphasis on their religions. Special attention will be given to the archaeological backgrounds of the Old and New Testaments and of the development of biblical faith in relation to its historical and cultural contents.

RL320 Peace, Justice, and Conflict Resolution

A multi-disciplinary approach to the nature and causes of aggression, violence, and war; to public policy on issues of defense and social services; to biblical and theological teachings and principles concerning war, peace, and justice; and to methods and strategies of resolving conflicts at all levels. Cross-listed with SO320.

RL321 - Asian Philosophy and Religion

Students explore philosophical and religious traditions of Asia. Traditions treated may include Hinduism, Buddhism in South and East Asia, Confucianism and Daoism. Emphasis is placed on the philosophical worldviews articulated in their respective texts. Cross-listed with PL321

RL331 - History of Christianity

This is a study of the Christian church from the close of the apostolic age to the Reformation; attention is centered on the emergence of Christian theology, on the evolution of ecclesiastical institutions, and on Christian biography.

RL332 - History of Christianity II

This is a study of selected topics in the history of the Christian church from the Reformation to the present; attention is centered on theological developments, on changes in ecclesiastical structures, and on Christian biography.

RL335 - History of American Methodism

This is a study of the development of English Methodism with focus of the Methodist movement in America. Students consider the influences of major American historical events on the church and the church's influence on historical, political, and social developments in America

RL336 - Thantology

This is a cross-cultural study of many aspects of the phenomena of death and dying, and of the associated rituals and processes accompanying them.

RL340 - Comparative Religion and Philosophy

This course treats a theme across a number of religious and philosophical traditions. Special attention is given to comparative methodology. Themes might include: evil, saints and sages, mysticism, food, etc. Cross-listed with PL340.

RL360 - Special Problems

This is an independent study or research on a subject of interest to an individual student. May be taken for 1-5 credit hours.

RL368 - Internship and Field Experiences

May be taken for 1-3 credit hours.

RL390 - Special Topics

This is an advanced course on a topic not included in the regular curriculum. May be taken for 1-3 credit hours.

RL480 - Religion Capstone

This course is open only to Seniors majoring in Religion, except by division chair's permission.

SC101 - Concepts in Physical Science

A study of the theory, interrelation, and application of concepts from Chemistry, Physics, Astronomy, Geology, and Meteorology presented in an activity format. Also explores teaching strategies for physical science concepts. Three lectures. MOTR PHYS 110 Essential in Physical Sciences Core 42 Website

SC101L - Concepts in Physical Science Lab

Lab exercises that accompany SC101. MOTR PHYS 110L Essentials in Physical Sciences with Lab Core 42 Website

SC103 - Introduction to Meteorology

A basic survey course of the atmosphere and atmospheric phenomena. Most topics in this Science course are presented descriptively. However, some familiarity with algebra and computers is assumed. Emphasis is placed on understanding and application of meteorological concepts to everyday life.

SC160 - Special Problems

Independent study or research based on reading and analysis of published sources on a subject of interest to an individual student. A student may take this course any number of times but with a limit of 8 hours on combined SC160, SC190, SC260, SC290, SC360, SC390, and SC460 counting towards graduation. May be taken for 1-5 credit hours.

SC190 - Special Topics

Advanced course on a topic not included in the regular curriculum. A student may take this course any number of times but with a limit of 8 hours of combined SC160, SC190, SC260, SC290, SC360, SC390, and SC460 counting towards graduation. May be taken for 1-5 credit hours.

SC225 - Interdisciplinary Science Seminar

For majors, this one hour course must be taken during the Freshman or Sophomore years. Designed to study and discuss research and issues in science and technology and to explore the role of scientists in research, education, and society. The seminar may be repeated each semester, but only 1 hour will count toward the major.

SC260 - Special Problems

Independent study or research based on reading and analysis of published sources on a subject of interest to an individual student. A student may take this course any number of times but with a limit of 8 hours on combined SC160, SC190, SC260, SC290, SC360, SC390, and SC460 counting towards graduation. May be taken for 1-5 credit hours.

SC268 - Internship and Field Experiences

Professional supervised internship and/or field experience. Students must fill out the appropriate forms for course credit and be approved by the division's internship coordinator. Students are expected to spend 40 hours in the internship and/or field experience for each hour of credit. A student may take this course any number of times but with a limit of 5 hours of combined SC268, SC368, and SC468 counting towards graduation.

SC290 - Special Topics

Advanced course on a topic not included in the regular curriculum. A student may take this course any number of times but with a limit of 8 hours of combined SC160, SC190, SC260, SC290, SC360, SC390, and SC460 counting towards graduation. Prerequisite: Instructor's permission.

SC325 - Interdisciplinary Science Seminar

Must be taken during the Junior or Senior year. Designed to study and discuss research and issues in science and technology and to explore the role of scientists in research, education, and society. A student may take the seminar any number of times, but only 1 hour will count toward the major.

SC331 - Research Methods

An introduction to the process of project design and proposal development for research projects in the Division of Mathematics, Science, and Computer Science.

SC360 - Special Problems

Independent study or research based on reading and analysis of published sources on a subject of interest to an individual student. A student may take this course any number of times but with a limit of 8 hours on combined SC160, SC190, SC260, SC290, SC360, SC390, and SC460 counting towards graduation. Prerequisite: Instructor's permission. May be taken for 1-5 credit hours.

SC364 - Undergraduate Research

Independent research involving the collection and analysis of data that is conducted under the supervision of a faculty member within the Division of Mathematics, Science, and Computer Science. Students are expected to spend 4 hours per week working on the research project for each hour of credit. A student may take SC464 any number of times but with a limit of 5 hours of combined SC364 and SC464 counting towards graduation. May be taken for 1-3 credit hours.

SC368 - Internship and Field Experiences

Professional supervised internship and/or field experience. Students must fill out the appropriate forms for course credit and be approved by the division's internship coordinator. Students are expected to spend 40 hours in the internship and/or field experience for each hour of credit. A student may take this course any number of times but with a limit of 5 hours of combined SC268, SC368, and SC468 counting towards graduation. May be taken for 1-5 credit hours.

SC382 - History and Philosophy of Science

A study of important discoveries of science and how they influenced our culture. The course entails a broad selection of topics from science and technology. There is emphasis on analyses of science related problems; making decisions about science related problems; and communicating solutions to science related problems.

SC390 - Special Topics

Advanced course on a topic not included in the regular curriculum. A student may take this course any number of times but with a limit of 8 hours of combined SC160, SC190, SC260, SC290, SC360, SC390, and SC460 counting towards graduation. May be taken for 1-5 credit hours.

SC401 - Conceptual Physical Science in the Elementary Classroom

An inquiry based approach to topics in physics, chemistry, astronomy, meteorology and geology. Experiments and activities to teach scientific concepts and to demonstrate teaching strategies are emphasized. Students are required to complete a project to incorporate the new knowledge into their teaching situation. Offered on demand.

SC402 - Advanced Conceptual Physical Science in the Elementary Classroom

Students further expand and apply their knowledge base in specific areas of Physics, Astronomy and Chemistry as applies to grade level. Constructivist teaching methods and strategies are explored in relation to personal and children's knowledge growth in the classroom environment. Offered on demand.

SC425 - Science Seminar

(Capstone) For majors, this one hour course must be taken during the Senior year for capstone credit. Designed to study and discuss research and issues in science and technology and to explore the role of scientists in research, education, and society. In addition to making a formal presentation, students will be expected to complete the standardized exit exam for their major and participate with the Career Development Center in resume preparation and career planning

SC460 - Special Problems

Independent study or research based on reading and analysis of published sources on a subject of interest to an individual student. A student may take this course any number of times but with a limit of 8 hours on combined SC160, SC190, SC260, SC290, SC360, SC390, and SC460 counting towards graduation. May be taken for 1-5 credit hours.

SC464 - Undergraduate Research Capstone

Independent research involving the collection and analysis of data that is conducted under the supervision of a faculty member within the Division of Mathematics, Science, and Computer Science. Students are expected to spend 4 hours per week working on the research project for each hour of credit. A student may take SC464 any number of times but with a limit of 5 hours of combined SC364 and SC464 counting towards graduation.

SC468 - Internship and Field Experiences

Professional supervised internship and/or field experience. Students must fill out the appropriate forms for course credit and be approved by the division's internship coordinator. Students are expected to spend 40 hours in the internship and/or field experience for each hour of credit. A student may take this course any number of times but with a limit of 5 hours of combined SC268, SC368, and SC468 counting towards graduation. May be taken for 1-5 credit hours.

SE203 Introduction to Special Education- MMB K-12

This course is an introduction to the profession of special education. History, theoretical foundations and practices related to the social, emotion, health, and learning characteristics of the individuals with mild-moderate disabilities are explored. The course includes an introduction to the educational and psychological characteristics (cognitive, emotional, and social) of school age individuals with mild-moderate disabilities and the implications these characteristics have for educational practice. Problems of definitions, screening, diagnosis, classification systems, transition, future planning, classroom management, and multicultural issues are introduced. Fall.

SE223 Career Development

This course will explore a variety of theories, concepts, principles, curriculums, and service delivery models utilized when planning and implementing effective career development and transition programs for the exceptional individual. Issues related to family dynamics and resources available in the community to support families and their children as they transition into adulthood will be explored. Students will learn techniques for interacting with parents/professionals and examine collaborative strategies for interdisciplinary efforts.

SE233 Special Education Processes

This course focuses on the legally mandated process involved in special education assessment, diagnosis, placement, and intervention. An analysis of federal, state, and local requirements is included. Emphasis is placed on the development of Individual Education Plan (IEP) with information provided on the development of Individual Family Service Plans (IFSP) and Individualized Transition Plans (ITP).

SE311 Curriculum Methods MMD K-12

This course provides an introduction to the educational and psychological characteristics (cognitive, emotional, and social) of K-12 individuals with mild-moderate disabilities and the implications that these characteristics have for educational practice. Problems of definitions, screening, diagnosis, classification systems, transition, future planning, classroom management, and multicultural issues are addressed. Information useful for selecting and developing intervention programs for students with mild disabilities including physical and other health impairments are addressed. Included is an overview of research in the field with emphasis on the study of instructional approaches emphasizing specific methods and materials. This course includes 20 hours of practicum experience.

SE313 Counseling in Special Education

This course presents approaches to working with school students, both with and without disabilities, in the home, school, and community environment. Students will focus on understanding, developing, and implementing approaches to interact with school students. Students will explore theories and practical methods to enhance positive relationships with families of school-aged children.

SE321 Diagnostic and Prescriptive Procedures

This course is an introduction to principles and practices in evaluation procedures in education and special education (preschool through adolescence). Students are also introduced to securing case histories and test administration and interpretation in basic development and skill areas.

SE340 Mathematics Instruction for Special Needs Students

This course focuses on the methods for diagnosis and remediation of mathematical skills and concepts of the special needs learner. The students will review, evaluate, develop, and provide individual and/or classroom trials of instructional components prepared for teaching remedial mathematics. The course will develop a greater depth of preparation and development of programs for exceptional children.

SE341 Literacy Instruction for Special Needs Students

This course builds upon the foundation provided by the previous reading and literacy coursework included in the elementary certification program. Students will learn how to adapt literacy instruction for the needs of individual students, small groups, and/or classroom settings.

SE345 Classroom and Behavior Management

This course is designed to acquaint pre-service and in-service teachers with genuine issues of classroom and behavior management and organization. Participants engage with information that will provide a clear view of the knowledge and skills to be internalized in order to maximize instructional opportunities and insure a successful professional career in Education.

SE503 Introduction to Graduate Study in Special Education

This course is an introduction to the profession of Special Education. The history and theoretical foundations of all disabilities, mild to severe, will be explored. Legally mandated processes involved in Special Education assessment, diagnosis, placement, and intervention along with the development of Individual Family Service Plans (IFSP), individual Education Plans (IEP), and Individualized Transition Plans (ITP) are introduced. Meets MEd Standard 1.

SE508 Advanced Organization and Management

This course involves the development and enhancement of strategies for developing, organizing, and administering a quality special education program. Meets MEd Standard 5.

SE513 Advanced Curriculum and Assessment

This course focuses on the educational and psychological characteristics of students with disabilities, mild to severe. Information useful for selecting and developing intervention programs for students with disabilities will be explored. Research in the field with emphasis on the study of instructional approaches emphasizing specific methods and materials will be introduced. Meets MEd Standard 4.

SE514 Special Education Internship

The internship will be a supervised school based experience with students with mild/moderate disabilities including physical and other health related impairments, autism, or emotional disturbance for a total of 100 clock hours. The student observes and uses strategies and techniques demonstrated by the classroom teacher and/or university supervisor. Meets MEd Standard 1.

SE533 Special Education Law

This course focuses on the specific court cases involved in special education identification, assessment, eligibility, and programming of students with a disability. This course will also encompass the area of 504, FERPA, and confidentiality. Meets MEd Standard 1.

SE545 Advanced Behavior Management

This course is designed to provide special education teachers with strategies for classroom and behavior management. Students will address such topics as a Functional Behavior Assessment (FBA), Behavior Improvement Plans, Adaptive Behavior Analysis, Discreet Trial Training, picture schedules, and picture stories. Meets MEd Standard 5.

SE590 Special Topics

1-5 hours. Advanced course on a topic not included in the regular curriculum.

SO101 - Introduction to Sociology

A study of social interaction and its products; culture, personality, social groups, institutions and social change.   MOTR SOCI 101 General Sociology Core 42 Website

SO102 - Social Problems

A study of the major problems of social and personal disorganization

SO150 - Introduction to Anthropology

A study of humans and their works from prehistory to the present. Covers the four major sub-fields of anthropology, in addition to anthropological theory and method.

SO190 - Special Topics

Introductory course on a topic not included in the regular curriculum. May be taken for 1-5 credit hours.

SO204 - World Cultures

A survey of western and non-western world cultures using anthropological and historical perspectives. Special emphasis on sample groups in Africa, India and Asia. Cross-listed with HI204.

SO260 - Special Problems

Independent study or research on a subject of interest to an individual student. May be taken for 1-5 credit hours.

SO268 - Internship and Field Experiences

May be taken for 1-5 credit hours.

SO290 - Special Topics

Intermediate-level course on a topic not included in the regular curriculum. May be taken for 1-5 credit hours.

SO301 - Race and Ethnicity in the United States

This course introduces students to contemporary race and ethnic relations in the United States. We examine how race has been socially constructed in the past, how racial identities are created and maintained in the present, the emergence and persistence of racial inequality, current beliefs and discourses about race, and how some groups are resisting racial inequality. We pay close attention to the relations between the dominant society and African-Americans, Asian-Americans, Latino-Americans, and Arab-Americans.

SO301.501 Race and Ethnicity in the United States

This course introduces students to contemporary race and ethnic relations in the United States. We examine how race has been socially constructed in the past, how racial identities are created and maintained in the present, the emergence and persistence of racial inequality, current beliefs and discourses about race, and how some groups are resisting racial inequality. We pay close attention to the relations between the dominant society and African-Americans, Asian-Americans, Latino-Americans, and Arab-Americans. Meets MEd Standard 6.

SO302 Urban and Rural Sociology

A survey of the relationship between urban and rural areas with particular attention to historical transformations and urban and rural renewal.

SO307 Sociology of Education

A survey of sociological theory as it applies to education. Education in America has been said to be rife with conflict and contradiction. The course examines the reasons, both stated and silent, for education in America, as well as the construction of a consensus of knowledge and its interplay in the plurality, which is our society. Includes examination of the various theoretical approaches to studying education from the sociological point of view. An ongoing thread of inquiry relates to the issues of gender, race/ethnicity, and class, and how these issues affect and are affected by the American educational system.

SO312 - Gender and Sexuality

This course examines how our conceptions of gender and sexuality influence our daily lives. The course will focus on how gender and sexuality are socially constructed; on media images of gender, gender inequality, heterosexuality, homosexuality, and bisexuality; on political and social issues associated with gender and sexuality, and on the various ways in which sexuality is practiced.

SO314 - Social Deviance

Sociological approaches to deviance are reviewed and various forms of social deviance are examined as is the process involved in changing the status of a behavior from deviant to not and vice-versa. Cross-listed with CJ314.

SO315 - Criminology

The nature, extent, causes, control and prevention of crime. Cross-listed with CJ315.

SO320 Peace, Justice, and Conflict Resolution

A multi-disciplinary approach to the nature and causes of aggression, violence, and war; to public policy on issues of defense and social services; to biblical and theological teachings and principles concerning war, peace, and justice; and to methods and strategies of resolving conflicts at all levels. Cross-listed with RL320.

SO321 - Family Relationships and Values

A study of interpersonal relations in courtship and marriage across cultures, with an emphasis on the currently changing values in the United States. There will be a focus on cultural, social, cognitive and emotional bases of intimacy, commitment, and family roles. Cross-listed with PY321

SO324 - Social Psychology

The basic principles that underlie social behavior, with emphasis upon the social aspects of personality and the psychological bases of interaction between individuals and groups. Cross-listed with PY324.

SO331 - Research Design and Data Analysis in the Social Sciences

An introduction to research design, social measurement, analytic strategies and applied statistical techniques relevant to the interpretation of social phenomena. Cross-listed with CJ/HI/PS/PY331.

SO334 - Applied Quantitative Data Analysis in the Social Sciences

A study of the application of quantitative analytic techniques to data in the social sciences. Cross-listed with CJ/HI/PS/PY334.

SO340 - Teaching with Historic Places

A multi-dimensional study of historic places for use in the social studies classroom to understand history, historical change, and cultural continuity. Cross-listed with HI340

SO350 - Social Theory

Analysis and application of sociological theory from past to present. Specific attention is given to the contemporary relevance and potential of perspectives and concepts

SO351 - Introduction to Counseling Theory and Practice

A study of basic theories and methods of counseling and psychotherapy, including: behavioral, cognitive, and humanistic approaches to counseling, client analysis, and interviewing techniques. Emphasizes goals, responsibilities, and ethical problems in the counseling relationship. Cross-listed with PY351.

SO360 - Special Problems

Independent study or research on a subject of interest to an individual student. May be taken for 1-5 credit hours.

SO368 - Internship and Field Experiences

May be taken for 1-5 credit hours.

SO390 - Special Topics

Advanced course on a topic not included in the regular curriculum. May bet taken for 1-5 credit hours.

SO395 - Sociology Senior Seminar

This capstone course focuses on the transition from college into a professional career. Students explore career options in areas such as work in non-profit organizations, social services, social work, for-profit organizations, government, and graduate school. Students will also create a resume, learn interviewing strategies, and complete an assessment portfolio. This course should be taken in the fall semester of a student's senior year.

SO480 - Senior Thesis - Capstone

Open to juniors and seniors majoring in Sociology. This course is a Senior thesis seminar. To receive credit in this course, all students must complete a directed research paper and successfully defend it before the faculty of the Division of Social Sciences.

SP101 Elementary Spanish I

This is an introduction to contemporary Spanish including oral practice, listening and reading comprehension, and the grammar necessary for spoken and written expression. There is also an introduction to Spanish culture. No prior Spanish is required. Students may test out of this course only through the authorized College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) test.  MOTR LANG 103 Spanish I Core 42 Website

SP102 Elementary Spanish II

This continuation of SP101 includes oral practice, listening and reading comprehension, and the grammar necessary for spoken and written expression. There is also an introduction to Spanish culture. Students may test out of this course only through the authorized College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) test.   MOTR LANG 104 Spanish II Core 42 Website

SP190 Special Topics

Variable credit hours, 1-5 hours. This is an introductory course on a topic not included in the regular curriculum.

SP203 Spanish Civilization

This is a survey of the historical and cultural heritage of Spain and Spanish America.

SP204 Spanish Civilization II

This course explores in depth language and literature of Spanish America with an in depth focus on writing fluency, literary interpretation, and culture.

SP260 Special Problems

Variable credit hours, 1-5 hours. This is an independent study or research on a subject of interest to an individual student.

SP268 Internship and Field Experiences

Variable credit hours, 1-5 hours.

SP290 Special Topics

Variable credit hours, 1-5 hours. This is an intermediate-level course on a topic not included in the regular curriculum.

SPM101 - Introduction to Sports Management

An introduction to the sports management profession, including an explanation of the various sports, and possible career opportunities.

SPM201 - Sports Management Pre-Internship

This internship preparatory course is for students seeking an internship in sports management. Students will research potential internships sites and develop a plan for finding an internship. Students will develop goals and learning objectives for their internship and will learn skills to make the most of their internship experience. Students will learn about and be responsible for the requirements regarding all appropriate required institutional internship forms, deadlines, fees etc.

SPM301 - Sports Management Post-Internship

Examination of the internship expertise, where the student reflects on their personal internship experience and shares the internship experience of fellow learners. Emphasis is placed on the student's assessment of their work performance, and the assessment of the internship employer.

SPM303 - Sports Marketing and Events

This course provides a framework for understanding the management and marketing strategies used within the sports management and marketing industries today. This course is intended to cover three basic components: sports as a medium, sports as a product and the emerging considerations relevant for the application of marketing techniques, tasks and event planning responsibilities that can be applied in amateur, recreational or professional sports, sporting events and entertainment events. Cross-listed with MK303.

SPM321 Organization and Administration of Sports and Athletic Programs

Examines recognized and successful ways of setting up physical education and athletic programs and carrying them out to meet stated aims and objectives. Specific attention is given to dealing with curriculum development, program creation, finance, physical layout, school policies, safety policies/practices, record keeping and purchasing and caring for equipment.

SPM345 - Law for Recreation and Sports Managers

This course is designed to develop student understanding of legal issues in the recreation and sports industry. Topics covered in this course will include tort law, contracts, personal liability, risk management, gender discrimination (Title IX), human resources, and drug testing.

SPM360 - Special Problems

Independent study or research on a subject of interest to an individual student. May be taken for 1-5 credit hours.

SPM368 - Internship and Field Experience

May be taken for 2-5 credit hours.

SPM480 - Sports Management Capstone

Capstone course for the Sports Management major: this course addresses the professional governance, standards, behaviors and expectations of the sport manager. Application of contemporary management and leadership concepts, principles, and issues related to the operation of sport organizations. Includes theories of organization and leadership.

TA103 - Basic Principles of Theatre

An introduction to the art of theatre including an introduction to both classic and modern plays, analysis and criticism of the plays and an examination of the roles of the director, the actor, the designer, and the technician. Fulfills "Fine Arts" requirement.

TA111 - Acting

This course introduces students to the craft of realistic acting focusing on the theory and practices originated by Constantin Stanislavski and his followers in the U.S. Students will read and practice exercises developed by the masters, applying them to individual exercises and scene work. Fulfills FINE ARTS requirement.

TA113 - Script Analysis

This course focuses on the analysis of play scripts with an emphasis on developing insights for theatre practitioners: designers, actors, and directors. Fulfills "Fine Arts" requirement.

TA384 Theatre History I

A study of theatrical history and drama from the golden age of Greece through the Renaissance. Fulfills FINE ARTS requirement.

TA386 - Theatre History II

A study of theatrical history and drama from the Restoration through today. Fulfills "Fine Arts" requirement.

TA388 - Dramatic Literature and Criticism

The study of dramatic literature from the golden age of Greece through today with an emphasis on 20th century drama. Fulfills HUMANITIES requirement.